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Letting Dreams Soar: How Travel Changed My Life

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Ever since I was a little kid, I’ve always dreamed of flying away to faraway places. I certainly have the travel gene. Every time I would see an airplane, my attention would dissipate for a moment while my 6-year-old self would ponder where the plane was going. It wasn’t long after our first family vacation to Florida that my interest in flying quickly became one of the consuming parts of my life. By the time I turned 15, I had flown well over 344,000 miles to four states. At that point, many people — especially my age — might consider this an accomplishment, or just insane. The truth is every single one of those miles was flown for a family…

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Author Adam Ehrlich Sachs Answers One Question About ‘Inherited Disorders’

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Rarely do writers compose a great piece by sitting down and just doing it. Countless hours of thought and uncertainty go into writing a poem, story or novel before typing a single word. Writers are often inspired to create something but many just don’t know where to start. Our most recent addition to the One Question and Answer series features Adam Ehrlich Sachs’ Inherited Disorders: Stories, Parables, & Problems (Regan Arts, May 3, 2016). Written in over 100 vignettes this short, short story collection spans over thousands of years exploring the often absurd dynamic between fathers and sons. So, that begs the question of how Sachs came to write so extensively on this subject. Question: What did you find so fascinating…

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Smart Reads: 6 Memoirs That Examine the Author’s Own History

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We love history here at BookTrib, which is why we featured 5 Fascinating Books that Shed a Fresh Light on History in February. But when we sat down to plan our Women’s History Month Smart Reads, we decided to take a slightly different angle. We wanted to feature women who are telling contemporary stories about their own lives. So here are six memoirs that explore family dynamics, grief and loss, redemption, reinvention, violence and peace, and that enduring thing called love. Red Eggs and Good Luck: A Memoir by Angela Lam (She Writes Press; October 6, 2015) “Red Eggs and Good Luck is the kind of honest, beautifully written memoir that will have you staying up way too late turning…

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Exclusive! Miya Tokumitsu on Why “Do What You Love” is Misleading

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Miya Tokumitsu never imagined when she wrote the article, “In the Name of Love” for JacobinMag.com that it would be picked up by Slate and quickly become an internet sensation. Since then, Tokumitsu has written DO WHAT YOU LOVE and Other Lies About Success and Happiness (Regan Arts, August 2015) in order to help other people realize where work and life should begin and end. Understanding that the mantra, “Do What You Love,” is sending out mixed signals to those entering the work force is something we, as a society, should become much more aware of. But most importantly, what Tokumitsu wants every working person to realize is that giving your all to your job doesn’t necessarily make you a better employee. Having…

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Exclusive! Kermit Roosevelt and George Takei Reveal the Cost of Allegiance

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We live in an era when a 14-year-old whiz-kid who brought a clock to school on his own was rewarded for his hunger for learning by being hauled away in handcuffs. Why? Because he’s a Muslim, and his teacher, who assumes the clock must be a bomb, calls the police. Aren’t we better than this? How can something like this happen in America? That incident should be of no surprise to those who know this country’s history—because victimizing people based on their ethnic heritage has happened here before. During World War II, between 110,000 and 120,000 Americans of Japanese heritage were place in internment camps, solely on the basis of their ethnicity. While the Greatest Generation was fighting for freedom and…

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