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Murder

“Ohio” by Stephen Markley Introduces New Voice(s) in American Fiction

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Ohio by Stephen Markley (Simon & Schuster) deserves to be only the first of a series because its characters are worth more than one book, and the story of their America is worth more than one look. This sprawling, spiraling novel begins one summer night in 2013, as four former high school classmates are about to meet again in New Canaan, their Rust Belt Ohio town. Each is traveling from far corners, each bearing memories that must be obeyed and secrets that will be revealed. The book is narrated from each of their viewpoints in a gripping saga that slowly builds into a symphony that hits all the right notes. New Canaan is a snapshot of so many places in…

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Art Teacher in Peril in Kelli Clare’s Debut Novel “Hidden”

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BookTrib is partnering with Bookish to bring you more great content. Can’t decide whether you want your next book to be a romance or a thriller? Never fear: If you pick up Kelli Clare’s debut novel Hidden, you don’t have to choose. This romantic suspense novel follows an art teacher named Ellie James who realizes that her life is in danger. A handsome stranger named Will Hastings appears and claims he will protect her from a bloodthirsty group named the Order, but will his help be enough? To celebrate this book’s June 5 release, check out this exclusive excerpt from the fourth chapter of Hidden. I pounded the side of my fist on the door frame. The police believed we were missing—we’d have to skip the funeral. Not…

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Tess Gerritsen Talks Return of Beloved Rizzoli and Isles with ‘I Know a Secret’

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One of the most interesting and sometimes-complicated aspects of a writer’s life is the inspiration that they use for their breakthrough novels. Tess Gerritsen recently shared with us the inspiration behind her latest release in the beloved TNT Rizzoli and Isles series, I Know a Secret. Here’s the story behind her inspiration in her own words: As happens with most of my books, the plot of I Know a Secret is a fusion of two different ideas. This is often how I come up with my stories, by melding together two or more premises into one. My 2010 thriller Ice Cold, for instance, was inspired by two different news articles, one about a U.S. military nerve gas accident in the…

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9 Books for Fans of ‘Murder on the Orient Express’

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The latest adaptation of Agatha Christie’s Murder on the Orient Express has finally hit theaters. Actor Kenneth Branagh stars as the iconic French sleuth Hercule Poirot, whose train journey is derailed by the murder of a notorious passenger. As one might expect from an adaptation of the Queen of Crime’s works, there are as many red herrings as there are potential suspects, and such close quarters creates a palpable sense of menace. Once violence breaks out on board, there’s nowhere to run—forcing predator and prey to sit side by side. The release has gotten us thinking about our other favorite mysteries—especially those set on trains. From a Patricia Highsmith classic to Poirot’s very first investigation, these books are perfect reads…

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Scotland Yard Detective Duo Take on Murder in Crombie’s ‘Garden of Lamentations’

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A new shipment from Texas transplant Deborah Crombie, brings another powerful thriller featuring the Scotland Yard detectives Duncan Kincaid and Gemma James. The most interesting aspect of Crombie’s novels, and this one (her 17th) does not fail to hit the high mark, lies in their characterizations. No two thriller writers write alike, but two schools stand out. One that accentuates plots and actions, while the other emphasizes characterization and, indirectly, intimacy. We travel through life with the protagonists outside of the investigation. We meet their families and evolve within their domestic spheres, their marriage, children, and personal problems. It goes without saying that this latter category makes for a different kind of reading and novel experience. Crombie is neither one…

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‘How to Get Away With Murder’: Books That Keep You Guessing Who’s Next

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Soapy and twisty, one of our favorites, How to Get Away With Murder, is everything you could want out of a Shonda Rhimes-helmed show. Complicated defense attorney Annalise Keating is the glue that holds it all together as she kicks ass in the courtroom, deals with her crazy and meddling students, and tries not to crack under the pressure of all those murders. Played by Davis, Annalise is the type of character we don’t quite fully like (or hate), but who we’re still rooting for anyway. Season 4 airs tonight on ABC and we’re already taking bets on just who might end up murdered this year. Davis was nominated for Outstanding Lead Actress in a Drama Series for this year’s 69th Emmy…

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Emily Carpenter’s ‘The Weight of Lies’ Brings us on a Thrilling Adventure

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How well do you really know someone? Do you know their life, their sorrows… their secrets? After reading Emily Carpenter’s newest novel, The Weight of Lies, you may ask yourself that question! Meg Ashley, daughter of Frances Ashley, the cult classic horror novelist, is fed up with the neglect and lack of interest her mother has had in her for so many years. For revenge, she agrees to write a tell-all book that details the truth about her mother, the famous author. She also writes about her troubled childhood as she prepares to rid her life completely of her self-centered mother. While conducting research and digging into the past, Meg begins to uncover some information that has to do with a murder…

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Dale Wiley Answers Our Burning Questions about ‘Southern Gothic’ and Anderson Cooper!

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Southern Gothic by Dale Wiley (Vesuvian Media) is on sale now and if we’re being honest, it’s a pretty interesting read with an intriguing plot and an ending that will knock your socks off! Want to know more about how Wiley came up with the idea for the novel and what Anderson Cooper has to do with the story?! Find out below. BookTrib: What inspired you to write Southern Gothic? Dale Wiley: I really didn’t have any ideas jumping out at me, and I just decided to try to write a book I would have loved to read. I loved playing with the novel within a novel, and I loved trying to work within the tradition of a “southern” novel. BT:…

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Too Many Secrets and Lies! Books that Transport You to Creepy Small-Town America

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On March 1, 2015 ABC introduced us to Ben Crawford (Ryan Phillippe) and his quaint neighborhood. What started off as any other morning in small-town America certainly turned into a rabbit hole of dark twists and turns when the body of a 5-year-old boy, Tom Murphy, appears in the rainy woods. If you are looking for your next show to bingewatch, Secrets & Lies should be in your queue. Each episode takes you inside cookie-cutter homes with more drama than a Real Housewives reunion. I personally watched this show from start to finish in a matter of two days, which concerned my boyfriend considering all of my focus was finding who the cold-blooded killer was. Finally, when I reached the last episode and everything came…

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Diagnosing Literary Characters, One Murderer at a Time

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Murder is contextual. Meaning, the action of killing by itself tells us nothing about underlying motivation. A murder in war, for example, has an entirely different motive than a serial killer’s compulsive, methodical kills. It’s apples and oranges, really: both fruit on the outside, but very different on the inside. If we want to understand the mind of a murderer, real or fictional, we need to understand motivation. Truth is, murderers have motivations for their kills and they usually have a moral code, too. A skewed moral code, but it’s one which makes their kills make sense to them, nonetheless. And hey, when you’re driven to kill, who cares what everyone else thinks. Right? These three fictional villains certainly don’t.…

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Author Emily Schultz Answers One Question about ‘The Blondes’

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It’s a beautiful spring day in the city as people stroll through the parks. Families are buying fresh greens from the farmer’s market, workers are hustling up and down Main St. to get to work. All seems well and good, until every blonde woman becomes a homicidal maniac. No, seriously. Emily Schultz uses allegorical horror and dark humor to show that nothing is really as it seems in her novel, The Blondes (Picador, paperback, April 12). Named one of NPR’s Best Books of 2015, Schultz comments on social constructs placed on women, like the need to be attractive and docile to male counterparts. Because her novel has such a wild and disturbing premise, we asked Schultz where she thinks horror fits into popular culture. Here’s her thoughts: Question: While The…

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Rich as sin: money and murder on Wall Street

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The rewards of Wall Street come fast and furious. Too fast for some; not fast enough for others. The Street is where big money is made and it’s all based on the same drive – greed. This is where the Milken’s and Boesky’s seemed joined at the hip in a cacophony of insatiable debauchery. So, how far would you go to be rich? Not just comfortably rich, but rich beyond your comprehension of rich? Rich as sin? Richer than Midas? In Nothing Personal: A Novel of Wall Street Mike Offit plumbs the deeper depths in which greed sinks to keep the wealth rolling in. Having worked the ‘Street’ for 25 years, Offit has written a novel that takes his readers on…

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