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motherhood

When Life Gets in the Way of a Book Launch

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Like a true first-time author, I had publication month all mapped out in my mind. As the date got closer, my anxieties and excitement mounted. The moment I’d been working for years toward was almost here, and nothing was going to get in my way. There would be travel for a book tour, of course; there would be flights to Austin and Seattle and Portland for talks and signings. There would be press and great bylines and buzz. And oh, there would be festivities too! What author isn’t most excited about the parties? I booked an evening launch party at my local wine bar. I hadn’t gone shopping yet, but I’d be lying if I hadn’t thought about what I’d…

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A Recovering Perfectionist Bans the Word Altogether

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Since her 2009 diagnosis of multiple sclerosis, Dr. Lisa Doggett has come to realize MS is no excuse to avoid challenges. Instead, it has propelled her to run two marathons, hike the Inca Trail to Machu Picchu, and complete a 168-mile bike ride to raise awareness for MS. She is currently working on a memoir about her journey from doctor to patient.  Today she shares her struggles with trying to live a “perfect” life and why she’s accepted it’s okay to diverge from this standard.  “Perfect!” That’s it. I’ve said it again. And I’m wrong. There’s no such thing. I’m a recovering perfectionist. I have been striving for Perfect my whole life. In so much of what I do, I…

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Tall Poppy Review: Ghosts of the Past in “One More Day”

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When someone dies, we may wish for more time with them. Just one more day. But what if that happened? What if they actually came back?This premise launches Kelly Simmons’s graceful and otherworldly suspense novel, One More Day (Sourcebooks Landmark) Carrie and her husband are mired in grief after the mysterious kidnapping of their son Ben. One second he was in his car seat. And the next, while his mother looked for change for parking, he was gone. The detectives have made no headway and the case is quickly turning cold. But then a year later, Ben returns. His parents are shocked and overjoyed. The detectives are astonished, as well as suspicious. But, there’s something odd about Ben’s reappearance. It’s been a whole…

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The Champion of Middle-Aged Mothers Is Back!

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Kate Reddy has returned in full force in Allison Pearson’s new novel with St. Martin’s Press, How Hard Can It Be?  Pearson’s character, Kate, is now older, more mature, a more seasoned character. Pearson’s column, Sandwich Woman, about women in midlife who struggle with their children and their parents as both grow older, is a perfect segue to Kate Reddy at close to 50. Clearly Kate has more on her plate than she might have ever contemplated. And for the many of us who remember her as a young working mother in Pearson’s debut novel, I Don’t Know How She Does It, her new challenges are striking.  We cheer her on as she battles and soothes her teenage daughter, and sympathize with her as…

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“That Kind of Mother” Takes on the Challenges of Race and Motherhood

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Rebecca Stone desperately needs help with her newborn and Priscilla, a La Leche nurse from the hospital comes to her rescue. Having experience being a mother herself when she was a single, teen mother many years ago, Priscilla leaves her job at the hospital to become the nanny for Rebecca’s baby. Rebecca feels extremely close to Priscilla, confiding her fears, the hopes and dreams she had for herself and has for her child. She looks at Priscilla as a source of stability in her life, all while learning how to care for a child, and just what it means to be a mother.  Priscilla ends up changing the way that Rebecca looks on not only motherhood, but also the world…

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DIY MFA Radio Episode 132: Capturing Diverse Experiences on the Page — Interview with Shanthi Sekaran

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This week Gabriela Pereira interviews Shanthi Sekaran about her new novel: Lucky Boy. This moving story is about two unforgettable women in California: an undocumented Mexican woman and an Indian-American wife, both of whom love the same child but can’t have him. The novel beautifully weaves together the themes of motherhood, immigration, infertility, adoption and minority life in America. It is a must-read in our current political environment. For more detailed show notes, visit DIYMFA.com/132.

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Oh, baby, what a shower gift! Honest books for expectant mothers

in Non-Fiction by

Crib sheets. Burp cloths. Receiving blankets. Diapers. These are useful items, for sure, but not exactly inspiring on the subject of motherhood. If you’re shopping for a baby shower, consider giving a gift that will provide the expectant mother a bit of comfort and insight as she approaches this major life change: a book. The recommendations we’ve included below are perfect for any mother looking for some helpful perspective on her little bundle of joy. Operating Instructions: A Journal of My Son’s First Year by Anne Lamott (Pantheon) Novelist and memoirist Anne Lamott captures her experiences as a single mother and recovering alcoholic during her son’s first year of life in a memoir that is both poignant and hilarious. Not…

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