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Michael Crichton

Raymond Chandler and 7 of the Best Thriller Writers Today

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The latest issue of Strand Magazine includes a superb, previously unpublished story by Raymond Chandler that’s a must-read for all mystery and thriller fans. Giving it a read made me think of the incredible influence writers like Chandler have had on the genre, inspiration for this month’s column featuring some of the best mystery and thriller writers working today. We start with Rhode Island native Lisa Gardner’s Look for Me (Dutton, 400 pages, $27.00). The Chandler influence is visible right from the start of a tale forged from the grand tradition of noir when the bodies of four out of five members of the Baez family are found murdered in their home outside Boston. The lone survivor, sixteen-year-old Roxanna, is…

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The 10 Best Science Thrillers Ever Written: Jon Land’s Picks

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So my latest Caitlin Strong thriller, Strong to the Bone, is heavily based in science, particularly bio-engineering, after clinical trials for a groundbreaking anti-rejection drug go horribly wrong. That results in bad guys, really bad guys, ending up in possession of what could be the ultimate weapon. So I got to thinking about the genesis of thrillers at least reasonably grounded in scientific principals, and I came up with a list of books to which I can only hope Strong to the Bone, to be published on December 5, 2017 by Forge Books, will be compared favorably. The Andromeda Strain, Michael Crichton What can I say? This is the grandfather of the entire genre by the man who practically invented…

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20 New Book Releases of The Week: Cookbooks, Suspense, Poetry and More

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December begins on Friday and if you haven’t begun shopping already for the holidays, then you have been thinking about it. For the next few weeks, we will be super-sizing the list of new releases to help you in your shopping quest for the perfect holiday gifts for book lovers. This week, we have books by cherished authors Danielle Steele, Tom Clancy, and Michel Crichton; the new addition to the Fifty Shades trilogy; internet phenomenon Rudy Francisco’s book of poetry; the journal of Vladimir Nabokov, published for the very first time; books on art; a memoir on Bob Dylan’s gospel years; and a few good cookbooks (because what’s better than curling up with your favorite holiday eats and a new book?).…

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#AmericaRecycles: Our Picks for the Environmentally Conscious Reader

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For the past few decades, we have been celebrating #AmericaRecycles as a way for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to recognize our nation’s progress on recycling, making a better future for generations to come. Go green today and pick up one of these environmentally conscious reads… and don’t forget to recycle when you are done!   Silent Spring, Rachel Carson Silent Spring has come a long way, where it was first published as excerpts in 1962. The book itself changed the way we look at the environment, and actually spurred revolutionary changes in that laws that affect our air, land, and water in America today. And who better to talk about the future of our planet itself than Rachel Carson, who has…

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The Lost City of Z Adaptation Gives Us Charlie Hunnam, Adventures and Dark Obsessions

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the lost city of z

Real talk: I would watch Charlie Hunnam in anything. Seriously, if the former Sons of Anarchy star sat in an empty room playing solitaire, I would still be glued to the screen. Especially if he’s shirtless. (Please, can he be shirtless?) So when I heard he was starring in The Lost City of Z, an adaptation of David Grann’s bestselling historical nonfiction tale, I knew I had to see it. Luckily, this movie looks awesome. Lush, adventurous, and an honest examination of what it means to have a lifelong, all-consuming obsession. Hunnam stars as Percy Fawcett, a 1920s British explorer who spends a large part of his career searching for the “Lost City of Z,” an ancient, hidden civilization that he…

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When the printed word inspired Best Visual Effects Oscars

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The act of reading, it’s been said, is like a vivid and continuous dream. As the reader’s eyes scan the page (or the computer screen), the words disappear, and the imagination constructs the world being conveyed by the author. Wondrous settings, fantastic beings and acts that are impossible to achieve in the real world unfold before the mind’s eye. How, then, are these flights of fancy recreated on the movie screen? For generations, that task has fallen to motion picture visual effects artists. These artisans and technicians, working in concert with directors, have been responsible for bringing that which can only be imagined to life. The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences have been handing out Oscars for Best…

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Breaking Bad is gone? Here’s a book list to feed your addiction

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There’s something wrong with my TV. I mean, it’s working OK and everything, but is has a problem: like millions of TVs across the country, it no longer carries new episodes of Breaking Bad, the most thrilling, gripping, exhilarating, suspenseful, jump-out-of-your-chair-and-scream-holy crap! television series ever broadcast, and quite possibly the best piece of drama committed to film that I’ve ever seen. Walter White is long gone. Ditto Jesse Pinkman, whose elated shout of, “YEAH, B*TCH! MAGNETS!”  remains one of my favorite pieces of dialogue in television history.     Mike Ehrmantraut is off to Belize. Skyler is a mere memory, although her desperate cries of “Shut up! Shut Up! SHUT UP!”  still ring in my ears.     And Saul Goodman’s…

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