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Maya Angelou

#ReadingBlackout: 28 Books by Black Women for Black History Month

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BookTrib is partnering with Bookish to bring you more great content. This February, in honor of Black History Month, readers are participating in #readingblackout, a movement started by BookTuber Denise D. Cooper that encourages readers to exclusively pick up books by black authors. The Bookish team couldn’t resist joining in, and since we can’t get enough of books written by talented women, we put together a recommendation list featuring 28 books (one for each day of February) written by black women. You’re sure to find a few familiar covers on this list, but we hope you also find some new reads for your TBR pile. We’d love to hear about the books you’re reading for #readingblackout. Tell us about them in the comments! We were so taken with Here…

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#TuesdayThoughts: The Meaning of Freedom

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The subjects of war, freedom and humanity have been trending on Twitter today. While our nation is one of the greatest democracies in the world, we still have a history with roots in the degradation and marginalization of others.  Despite this history, however, we also know what freedom looks like. Our #TuesdayThoughts are on the meaning of freedom with quotes from some of the greatest minds from around the globe. “For to be free is not merely to cast off one’s chains, but to live in a way that respects and enhances the freedom of others.” – Nelson Mandela “Freedom lies in being bold.” – Robert Frost “We must be free not because we claim freedom, but because we practice it.” –…

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*NEW*: The Weekly Round Up with Stories about Oprah, Sam Shepard and Studio 54

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We have a new weekend column on BookTrib! The Weekly Round Up will cover all the news in the publishing world! Each Saturday and Sunday, look for us to keep you abreast of what you need to know about your favorite writers, literary events, openings and book signings. This week, we kick off our new column with news about Oprah’s latest book, a new Studio 54 picture book and the startling statistics about WHO is really getting published (it may surprise you and it may not). We hope you will come back each week and catch up on all news. ‘O, That’s Good’: Oprah Winfrey Dishes with ABC on her New Book and the Scandal That’s Rocking Hollywood Not only…

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Girls Trip and 6 Female Authors With Record Breakers at the Box Office

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Now that the summer movie season is officially over, it’s time to take stock. Overall, it hasn’t been the strongest year, with reboots bombing left and right, and even well-established franchises like Pirates of the Caribbean failing to find an audience. But not every movie tanked. There were a few standouts, and many of them happened to be directed or written by women. Two of the biggest record smashers of the summer were the Patty Jenkins directed Wonder Woman, and Girls Trip, which was written by two women, Kenya Barris and Tracy Oliver. Girls Trip recently made headlines for breaking the $100 million mark, making it the first film to make over $100 million that was written, directed, and produced by…

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BOOK NEWS ROUNDUP: Apple Changes StoryTime Forever, Emma Watson is a Book Fairy, Trump’s Win Explained in Literature

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The election is understandably still on everyone’s mind. But there was some interesting literature news peppered into all the politics last week. Here’s our weekly roundup of what went down in the world of books: Apple Revolutionizes StoryTime Bedtime has never looked so electronic! This week, Apple launched a new app called iBooks StoryTime that allows parents to download and read children’s books on their TV. Not only are the pictures and words large enough for young eyes to see, but it’s also interactive: some books have sound effects and highlighted words. The whole app also has a Read Aloud function, which means that on certain books, pages will flip automatically when you’re done reading the words. The app is…

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Children portray Black History Month icons in Because of Them, We Can

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Today we are giving you a dose of cuteness for a cause.     The Because of Them, We Can campaign was born from photographer Eunique Jones Gibson’s desire to share the rich history of black people as well as the limitless future potential by using photographs that challenged negative stereotypes.     This is bigger than taking pictures of cute children dressed as influential people of African descent. It is about empowering children, giving them a sense of worth based on their shared history, letting them know that they can do all that their predecessors did and even more.     To learn (and see) more, visit Because of Them, We Can.    

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Maya Angelou: America’s poet laureate and a voice for the voiceless

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When death took Maya Angelou on Wednesday at the age of 86, it claimed a pioneer, stilled a pen for the ages, and silenced a voice for those who had none. “My mission in life,” Angelou once said, “is not merely to survive, but to thrive, and to do so with some passion, some compassion, some humor, and some style.” Angelou accomplished that mission through what seemed to be a multitude of lifetimes that included a host of careers and a legion of trials and tribulations. Primarily known as an essayist and a poet, Angelou is perhaps best remembered as the author of the autobiography, I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings, and for the recitation of her poem “On…

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