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Marilyn Monroe

Gentleman Prefer Books: Flirty Marilyn Monroe Reads

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BookTrib is partnering with Early Bird Books to bring you more great content, including this article on the 55th anniversary of Marilyn’s death. We’re turning to the books that reveal the woman behind the glamour who led a troubled, but extraordinary life. In June of 1926, a girl named Norma Jeane was born to an unknown father and flapper mother. Within a span of ten years, she became an orphan—shuffled around the California foster care system. But by the mid-1940s, she started signing contracts with Hollywood’s most famous studios. This marked the end of Norma Jeane, the orphan, and herald the arrival an American icon and sex symbol: Marilyn Monroe. It’s been 55 years since Marilyn died, but time has done nothing to weaken her hold…

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Mixology & Movies: The Perfect Drink for Your Favorite Flicks

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I have been blessed with offspring and 11 nieces and nephews—12 if you count my honorary niece. I’m looking forward to their holiday merriment and flying wrapping paper but when December 26 rolls around I’m going to desperately need some grownup recreation. This means movie night with adult beverages and the little ones safely tucked in for their long winter naps (or for the teens, long winter multi-player games). For this soirée I’m gleaning inspiration from two terrific volumes of mixology: Gone with the Gin: Cocktails with a Hollywood Twist by bartending’s merry punster Tim Federle (Running Press; October 2015) and Cocktails of the Movies: An Illustrated Guide to Cinematic Mixology by Will Francis and Stacey Marsh (Prestel; October 2015).…

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Anna Godbersen on fathers, daughters and life imitating art

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by Anna Godbersen I suppose every writer has a life imitates art story, and this is mine. At the end of summer, I sent my agent a hundred pages of what I hoped would become my first novel for grownups, and flew to Greece. This should have felt triumphant and in many ways it did. The conceit was that a KGB agent has manipulated Marilyn Monroe’s famous daddy issues and thus compelled her to spy on President John F. Kennedy, which I believed was a glamorous and wild enough premise to attract all kinds of readers; and yet writing it had been intensely personal, and had allowed me to get at my own ideas about men and women, performance and…

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