Tag archive

Liveright

LGBTQ Reads: Jazz Jennings and Kody Keplinger Among Authors Embracing Pride Month

in Fiction by

June is Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender and Queer Pride Month, and in light of the upcoming election and the tragedy that occurred in Orlando, reading books about LGTBQ characters is more important than ever. Ten years ago it was almost impossible to find queer main characters in popular literature, with readers often needing to seek out indie titles or search through self-published e-books to find non-heteronormative stories. But lately there has been a boom in LGBTQ publishing, particularly in genres like Young Adult literature. And while we definitely still have a long way to go, it’s clear that readers are clamoring for more and more books that celebrate the LGBTQ community. So as we close out Pride Month, we thought it only fitting…

Keep Reading

TED Talks: Ann Morgan on Reading the World in Just One Year

in Non-Fiction by

In 2011, Ann Morgan, who considered herself a “relatively cultured person,” realized that virtually every book on her bookshelf was written by either an English or North American author. In her TED Talk at this year’s TED Global in London this past September, she discusses her journey throughout 2012 – the year she decided to read one book from every country in the world. She chronicled her literary journey on her blog, A Year of Reading the World, and found that when you open yourself up to the world with an open mind, the world will respond enthusiastically. You can read her thoughts about giving a TED Talk in her latest blog post, and check out her full international reading…

Keep Reading

Review: The Mad Feast is This Year’s Fun and Frantic Cookbook

in Non-Fiction by

Matthew Gavin Frank’s previous book was about the discovery of the giant squid, and he has also written memoirs of working at a marijuana farm and an Italian vineyard. Given that unconventional publishing history and his background—he spent 20 years in the restaurant industry but is also a poet and creative writing teacher—it’s no surprise that his new book about America’s signature foods is no straightforward, one-genre affair. Instead, Frank describes The Mad Feast (Liveright; November 9, 2015) as a “spastic, lyrical anti-cookbook cookbook of sorts that also may be a fun and digressive revisionist take on U.S. history.” Indeed, it is the off-the-wall blend of memoir, travel, history and fiction that makes the book unique. This is the cookbook…

Keep Reading

Go to Top