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jane the ripper

ICYMI: ‘Killing Jane’ Takes Jack the Ripper By the Throat

in Thrillers by

I liked this book very much and would give it five stars!  It was well written and the characters were fully developed.  All in all, a great thriller and we’re hoping there will be more to come from this author. Murders mimicking the savagery of the most infamous serial killer of all time abound in Stacy Green’s mystery/thriller, Killing Jane, which remind us that violence can surface at any time and come from the most unlikely sources. What if Jack the Ripper was really Jane the Ripper? This new book poses this question based on a theory of a London cop from the 19th century that Jack was really a woman. Washington D.C. police detective Erin Prince discovers, as her…

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Interview with Stacy Green and Killing Jane (Video)

in Thrillers by

WHAT IF EVERYTHING YOU’VE EVER HEARD ABOUT JACK THE RIPPER IS WRONG … A young woman is brutally murdered in Washington D.C., and the killer leaves behind a calling card connected to some of the most infamous murders in history. JACK THE RIPPER Rookie homicide investigator Erin Prince instinctively knows the moment she sees the mutilated body that it’s only a matter of time before someone else dies. She and her partner, Todd Beckett, are on the trail of a madman, and a third body sends them in the direction they feared most: a serial killer is walking the streets of D.C. THE CLOCK IS TICKING. Erin must push past her mounting self-doubt in order to unravel a web of…

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Does the History of Jack the Ripper Lead Us to Discovering He was Really Jane the Ripper?

in Fiction by

Several years ago, I stumbled on the theory that Jack the Ripper could have been a woman. As history goes, Inspector Frederick Abberline briefly considered a midwife as the killer. There’s no evidence Abberline seriously pursued this theory, and most Ripperologists dismiss the idea since little to no trace or forensic evidence pointed to a woman as the killer. But the seed was planted, growing like a stubborn dandelion in an otherwise perfectly manicured lawn. In 1939, William Stewart published Jack the Ripper: A New Theory. Stewart focused on four key questions: What sort of person could move about late at night without raising suspicion in their own household or on the streets? Who could walk the streets in blood…

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