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Ian Fleming

Early Bird Books: 8 Notable Books That Inspired Memorable Movies

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Books and movies have a relationship that’s as old as Hollywood itself. Together, writers and filmmakers have given us everything from great adaptations to huge disappointments, and some truly weird interpretations in between. But that comes with the territory of turning our favorite words into live action pieces of cinema. If you’re a fan of both books and movies, check out these eight books that inspired adaptations. The Color Purple, Alice Walker The Color Purple won the Pulitzer Prize in 1983 and went on to inspire the classic 1985 Steven Spielberg film of the same name. With apologies to Spielberg, Walker’s novel remains the definitive version of the story. Walker’s book uses a technique that film just can’t accommodate. The…

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Anthony Horowitz’s Trigger Mortis Contains Ian Fleming 007 Material

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This fall, James Bond is reporting for duty—in two different stories in two different media, and in two different eras. The man known as 007 will first appear in Trigger Mortis (HarperCollins, September 8, 2015) by Anthony Horowitz, the latest novel bearing the stamp of approval from the estate of Bond creator Ian Fleming. Fleming passed away back in 1964, shortly after the publication of You Only Live Twice, the 12th novel featuring the character who would, thanks to his cinema incarnation, become fiction’s greatest spy. After Fleming’s death, two of his Bond works would be published posthumously: 1965’s The Man with the Golden Gun and a collection of short stories titled Octopussy and The Living Daylights (1966). Over the…

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The Cold War Returns in the Man from U.N.C.L.E.

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Ever find yourself pining for the simpler time of the Cold War? Ah, those were the days. There were only two sides: Them vs. Us. Good vs. Evil. Spy vs. Spy. So there’s good news for those of you who liked your war cold: This week (which happens to mark the 54th anniversary of the construction of the Berlin Wall), The Man From U.N.C.L.E hits the big screen. And while the movie—a remake of the popular 1960s TV show—may not be an accurate representation of the world of professional espionage, it does represent a throwback to an era when spies were cool; their martinis were shaken, not stirred; and they all came equipped with awesome gadgets to help them foil…

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