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Harper Collins

Abigail DeWitt: How Trump Killed My Taste for Profanity

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The top critical Amazon review of my last novel, Dogs, laments that “there was unnecessary use of the ‘F’ word.” The novel is from the point of view of a pot-smoking, shoplifting teenager in the 1970s. What did the reader expect? I laughed and figured I was in good stylistic company: I’d once heard Junot Diaz criticized on NPR for his “language,” and the radio host wasn’t talking about the rhythm of his sentences. In fairness to my Amazon critic, it isn’t only when I’m inside the mind of a fictional character that I’m drawn to profanity. I’ve loved swearing since I was a little girl. My father, who taught me to love good writing, swore like the Navy veteran…

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Author and Entrepreneur Peter Kozodoy Fills BookTrib in on Publishing’s Millennial-Driven Future

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Since Gutenberg’s printing press, the book world has been in constant flux. But never have we seen such a drastic change in platform, genre, subject matter, and style than we have these last 15 years. Instead of the paperback, you get the Kindle format. Or, instead of the tablet, you get the audio book. Millennials. We’re making everything go so fast. We want it now, all the time, every time. Now. Now. Now. So, how do books fit into this world when we all feel like we don’t have enough time to enjoy our coffee, let alone read a 300-page novel? According to entrepreneur Peter Kozodoy, the publishing industry is in a great position to move with the times precisely…

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The Books We’re Crazy about on National Book Lovers Day!

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It’s National Book Lovers Day and as you would expect, we’re pretty flipping happy here at BookTrib! It’s basically our holiday. So while you’re sitting at your desk, up to your ears in work, we’ve decided to take the day and just — read. Curious about what we’re reading? We’ve compiled a list just for you! Here are the books we’re currently obsessing over that we just had to share with our fellow books lovers on National Book Lovers Day: Sacred and Stolen: Confessions of a Museum Director, Gary Vikan (SelectBooks, September 20, 2016) JeriAnn: I always thought that the Indiana Jones movies were a ridiculous exaggeration—surely no one in archeology or art would treat a historic relic so brutally. Where were…

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Book Excerpt! Melissa Marr’s ‘Seven Black Diamonds’

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Are you a Melissa Marr fan? Do you have a monthly spreadsheet on your computer of every YA/Fantasy/Fae novel releasing soon? If so, then we’ve got the read for you! On the off chance that you haven’t yet checked out Marr’s Seven Black Diamonds, you’re sadly missing out. Last week, we gave Marr’s most recent release a temperature of 94 in our Heat Index column, writing, “Lilywhite Abernathy, daughter of a wealthy crime boss, has anything she could ever want at her fingertips, she also happens to be half-faerie, half-human. But on her 17th birthday, life changes and thrusts her into the world of the Black Diamonds, six half-humans just like her, who are determined to destroy the human race. Now positioned firmly in the middle…

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Heat Index: 5 Hot New Books that Sent Us Straight to Fantasy Land

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Fantasy/urban fantasy, science fiction and dystopian genres are some of the hottest books available right now, especially in YA, and I’m going to be completely honest: I had a really hard time ranking these five amazing novels. From Gena Showalter to A.L. Davroe to Karen Marie Moning, I just couldn’t say a bad thing about any of them. That’s why you’ll find that the temp never dropped below 90° in this edition of Heat Index. Get ready to dive right in, because you’re going to want to immerse yourself in these worlds. Guile, Constance Cooper (Clarion Books, March 1, 2016) “Memorable, well-drawn characters…Those who like unusual fantasies will enjoy this and will identify with the appealing Yonie as she searches for her roots and a place…

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The Original Fan Fiction Prequel Marks its 50th Anniversary

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It may not be entirely fair to refer to Wide Sargasso Sea by Jean Rhys (WW Norton & Co.; reissuing January 25, 2016) as the first great work of fan fiction—it stands entirely on its own as a classic. But the “prequel” to Charlotte Brontë’s Jane Eyre, which celebrated its 50th anniversary of publication this week, is the grandmamma of an entire genre that has spun some classic novels. In case you missed it in English class, Wide Sargasso Sea answers one of the biggest questions from the pages of Jane Eyre—who was the woman in the attic and what drove her mad? Author Rhys wasn’t satisfied with Bronte’s explanation that all Creole women are crazy and instead spent nearly…

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Heat Index: 5 Hot New Books to Read Over the Holiday Break

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It’s here! Christmas is almost upon us and that means you’re packing, wrapping, traveling, cooking and generally going holiday-crazy doing whatever must be done before the big day arrives. However, the holiday break also offers us some much-needed relaxation time off from work or school. There’s no better way to chill than cozying up to a great book and diving in. So, whether you’re cuddled up with a blanket near the tree in between gift-wrapping sessions, or riding in the passenger seat on your way to Grandma’s house, we have five hot new reads perfect for all of your holiday escapism needs. Carrying Albert Home: The Somewhat True Story of A Man, His Wife, and Her Alligator, Homer Hickam (William Morrow; October 2015) “Must-read… A…

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The “Dear Santa” Letter Every Book Lover is Writing This Christmas

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Dear Santa, It’s been a while since I’ve written to you. Twenty years or so, at least. But I feel like we still have a pretty solid connection, and I’m not gonna lie — I might be in my 30s, but sometimes I still lie awake on Christmas Eve staring at the ceiling and wondering if that scratching sound I hear is actually a reindeer and not just the cat crawling around on the roof. Ahem. Since the magic of Christmas is still pretty tied up in you, Santa, I’m finally giving into it this year. With nothing left to lose, here’s my Christmas List. Please don’t be stingy with that wrapping paper. A Book Boyfriend Come to Life I…

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These WWII Resistance Techniques Act as Modern-Day Sabotage In the Workplace

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At the height of World War II, the American Office of Strategic Services, or OSS—the forbearer of the modern CIA—published a handbook for resistance fighters operating behind enemy lines. The Simple Sabotage Field Manual instructed Allied supporters on how to slow down the Axis machine from within. Slashing tires, stopping up fuel lines, starting fires, shorting out electrical systems and damaging machine parts were all little things that resistance operatives were urged to do. By themselves, these actions didn’t add up to much, but the cumulative effect, it was hoped, would greatly hinder the Axis’s march across Europe. The manual was intended to inflict death by a thousand cuts to the enemy. Also within the manual was a list of…

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Heat Index: 5 Hot New Books Deserving of Their Own Category

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Have you ever had a completely random pile of books that you’re dying to read but don’t know which one to start first? That was my dilemma this week for Heat Index. Each of the books that I picked is fabulous in its own right, but I just didn’t have a category that each one fit in. That is, until I had five of them and the category made itself! From a magical and dystopian world, to WWII, to love a second time around, there’s something here for everybody. The Gilded Life of Matilda Duplaine, Alex Brunkhorst (MIRA Books, September 22, 2015) “Brunkhorst’s story is full of memorable characters and contains a first-rate plot; the latter will delightfully surprise the reader.…

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Heat Index: 5 Hot New Books that Depict Heroines’ Survival Stories

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This week’s Heat Index honors the women in fiction who will stop at nothing to live a happy and fulfilled life, regardless of who tried to knock them down or what circumstances led to the difficult situations they found themselves in each day. They’re stories about love, friendship and family and the journey to self-discovery that proves it’s not always about what you don’t have, but what you make of what you do have that matters most. The Mistake I Made, Paula Daly (Grove Press, September 15) “[Daly] writes with a singular voice and a fierce passion that roars off the page, while also displaying a visceral understanding of the betrayals and humiliations of domestic life.” —Daily Mail Heat Index: Roz…

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Zoey Deutch Picked for Film Adaptation of Lauren Oliver’s Before I Fall

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Deadline is reporting that the Lauren Oliver critically acclaimed, New York Times bestselling novel, Before I Fall (Harper Collins, March 2010), has officially nabbed its leading lady for the film adaptation. Zoey Deutch, daughter of actress Lea Thompson, will play Samantha Kingston, “a high school senior who finds that she may be living the last day of her life over and over until she gets it right,” Deadline writes. “If you had only one day left on earth who would you kiss, who would you tell the real truth to, who would you save? Amid that, she must untangle the mystery surrounding her death—and discover the true value of everything she is in danger of losing.” Deutch, who’s starred in both television and film,…

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Getting a Taste of Summer From Audrey Hepburn’s Kitchen

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Audrey Hepburn was a girl after my own heart – or perhaps in this case, my stomach. She was not without her vices in the kitchen – Hepburn’s favorites included pasta, chocolate, vanilla ice cream with fudge sauce, wine and of course, an after dinner cigarette. Her son Luca remembers her propensity for eating generous helpings of pasta and gaining no weight (a trait that Ms. Hepburn and I do not share!) Luca also provides us with a heartwarming look her classic dishes in Audrey at Home: Memories of My Mother’s Kitchen by Luca Dotta with Luigi Spinola (Harper Design, June 16, 2015). Each page is filled with photographs, handwritten recipes, cooking tips and notes written to friends. Her beloved…

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American Masters’ Filmmaker Discusses Harper Lee Documentary on PBS

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If you want to take part in the unprecedented literary celebration that is the release of Harper Lee’s Go Set a Watchman (Harper, July 14), the “parent” novel of her classic To Kill a Mockingbird, you don’t even have to leave your home—it’s coming to a television and computer near you. As part of the Watchman festivities, THIRTEEN, New York’s flagship public television station, is presenting “THIRTEEN Days of Harper Lee,” an on-air and online collection of programming celebrating the author and her work. One of THIRTEEN’s special programs will be an airing of an updated version of Harper Lee: Hey, Boo, a documentary by Emmy award-winning filmmaker Mary McDonagh Murphy. The airing will take place on THIRTEEN’s American Masters…

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