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grief

Liam Callanan on Bookstores, Travel and Magic of Paris

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Who doesn’t love Paris? Whether it’s the language, the culture, the food, or just that element of je ne sais quoi, there’s something magnetic about the city. With so many different words that could be used, it’s telling that perhaps the most common word to describe the city is magic. And no one, it seems, understands that better than author Liam Callanan. His latest novel, Paris by the Book (Dutton), is set in city and thoroughly explores the ways that Paris not only changes you, but allows you to change within it. When Leah’s husband disappears, leaving behind only airplane tickets to Paris for her and their two daughters, Leah makes a spur of the moment decision and puts them all on the plane. There,…

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Orly Konig Deftly Balances the Ebb and Flow of Grief

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People talk a lot about the different stages of grief and how you have to go through one after another until you finally come out on the other side of it, ready to face the world again. But what happens when life stalls at one of those stages? Carousel Beach (Forge Books) by Orly Konig takes readers deep beneath the surface of that question, navigating through the murky layers of fear and guilt and, ultimately, to the hope that lies at the heart of this touching novel. The story centers on Maya Brice, a restoration artist, and the beloved carousel she is painstakingly bringing back to life one animal at a time. A year after losing her grandmother and her unborn child,…

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‘Only Child’ Author Rhiannon Navin on School Shootings, Family and Grief

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I loved Only Child, the debut novel from Rhiannon Navin, written from the perspective of a first grader, Zach, who experiences a school shooting. The writing pulled me in so much, I couldn’t put down the book until I finished; I think about the characters and how they dealt with tragedy and loss everyday, and I see the value of empathy now more than ever. I felt hesitant when I was ready to pick up my copy – we as a country are experiencing the aftermath of a school shooting once again and emotions are difficult to keep in check when thinking about the minute by minute experience of the kids during the occurrence, so I was not sure I was…

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Ella Joy Olsen’s Take on Grief and Redemption in ‘Where the Sweet Bird Sings’

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A wonderful group of writers has come to our attention at BookTrib.com and we want to share this fantastic find! The Tall Poppies are not only writers, but avid readers, who on a weekly basis introduce us to many wonderful books! We never know how we’ll handle grief until we’re forced into it. In Where the Sweet Bird Sings, Ella Joy Olsen takes us to that deep place and gives the reader a beautifully rendered story that will alternately break your heart and make you hopeful. Emma Hazelton is frozen by grief. She’s just lost her beloved grandfather a year after losing her young son to a rare genetic disease. Her husband wants to move forward with their lives and have another…

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“Olicity” Watch: Team Arrow Battles Grief and Guilt

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Warning: Spoilers Ahead! And we’ve come full circle. The season started with Oliver standing by a grave and this week we watched the scene play out in real time. Only now we know who’s buried down there and how everyone is reacting to that death. This was a transitional episode that was heartfelt at times and a little ridiculous at others. There wasn’t much “Olicity,” but the embers of their relationship are clearly still burning. I’ll take whatever I can get at this point. felicitys.tumblr.com Here’s our Olicity Watch for 4×19, “Canary Cry”: Recap: It’s (another) episode about guilt, with everyone jumping over each other to take the blame for Laurel’s death. It’s a toss up to see who feels…

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Anne Lamott discusses grief and forgiveness in Small Victories

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Anne Lamott has become known for her ability to write about such diverse topics as becoming a single mother after recovering from addiction, her son as a teenaged father, the craft of writing, and her faith with openness, grace and self-deprecating humor. In the 35 years since her first book was published, Lamott—a winner of the Guggenheim Fellowship and an inductee to California’s Hall of Fame—has become one of America’s most beloved and celebrated writers. Her newest book, a collection of essays titled Small Victories: Spotting Improbable Moments of Grace (Riverhead, 2014) offers a message of hope and stories of triumph over hardship. BookTrib sat down with Lamott recently to discuss her views on the forgiveness and grief, which underscore…

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Spiritual teacher Francine Vale on healing in the long, dark shadow of 9/11

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Francine Vale is a spiritual teacher who has helped many repair emotional and physical scars through her healing sessions and widely sought-after workshops. Her memoir, Song of the Heart: Walking the Path of Life (World of Love), shares the story of how she came to learn what she was meant to do: help others let go of fear and frustration and open their hearts to love and healing. To mark the 13th anniversary of 9/11, Vale spoke about paths to healing on the anniversary of this national trauma. BOOKTRIB: September 11 remains a difficult day nationally and individually. How can we continue to honor those we lost without losing ourselves in grief? FRANCINE VALE: The creation of day-long memorials may…

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