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feminism

Everyone’s Favorite Betches Serve Work Expertise

in Nonfiction by

The work world can be just, ugh. Especially in the early years when you are still trying to find the best way to spend most of your waking hours and make enough money to live independently. Luckily for us, the digital brand Betches Media, known for its humor and definitive presence as a reigning social media queen, has recommendations for us in its new career book When’s Happy Hour? (Gallery Books). With tips from some pros, we don’t have to spend all day at work counting the seconds until we can try to drink our problems away leave. For those who have never heard of Betches, the brand was born as a fun project among three friends (Aleen Kuperman, Jordana Abraham, and Samantha Fishbein)…

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“Alice Isn’t Dead:” Popular Podcast is Now a Novel

in Pop Culture by

Buckle in and get ready for a risky road trip! The podcast Alice Isn’t Dead has gained a lot of popularity over the years, and now fans have a novel to go with it (Harper Perennial) — coming out this month from Joseph Fink. The novel fits nice and cozy into the horror genre, but it’s probably nothing like your run-of-the-mill thriller. The overall story of the Alice Isn’t Dead novel is female-driven — that is, the protagonist is female and she drives a truck. Keisha is all-too relatable. She has fears, worries, likes, dislikes, and idiosyncrasies (like how she always gets a turkey club at roadside diners). She loves deeply, cares with her whole self, and will die for the…

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“Trouble Brewing:” A Rom-Com Just in Time for Oktoberfest

in Romance by

Grab a chilled beer and dust off your lederhosen: it’s Oktoberfest. Not all beer enthusiasts can jet to Germany to join in the true revels of the celebration, but that doesn’t mean you can’t get in the spirit other ways! Beer in books? Yes! Even as a self-proclaimed wine person, I couldn’t help but carried away with Trouble Brewing (Gallery Books). Suzanne Baltsar’s contemporary romance is as much of a love story as it is an endearing (yet open-eyed) look at the beer industry, for all of its allure, stigma and structural faults.  The two protagonists, Piper Williams and Blake Reed, each have a passion for the beer industry, but have many  pressures, societal and personal, that try to cut their…

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Guest Blogger: When Being Thrifty With Words Matters

in Girly Book Club by

This sentence has five words. This entire review has 485.  Jean’s limit is 100 words per day.   In her debut novel Vox, Christina Dalcher (Penguin) imagines an America where every female must wear a wrist counter that keeps track of the number of words they speak. Sort of a like a compulsory Fitbit, except this device measures words, not steps – and, oh yeah, it zaps you with increasing jolts of electricity if you go above the limit. Non-verbal communication (sign language, writing of any kind, pantomiming) is also forbidden. Books are banned. Of course, these restrictions only apply to those born without a Y chromosome. A typical dinner at Jean’s house is a chatty affair: she has a husband…

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Technology and Terror Fill Shah’s Dystopian Society

in Fiction by

In Bina Shah’s Before She Sleeps (Delphinium), the ratio of men to women in a South West Asia capital has become increasingly and critically low. In order to fix the problem, the government has taken on using modern technology, combined with terror, to ensure that women take on multiple husbands, to have as many children as fast as possible. But, there are those who resist: women who live underground, refusing to participate in this society, and are protected by the most elite members of society. Coming out secretly at night, these women provide the elite with the only commodity they can’t buy: intimacy and closeness without sex. But time moves on, and there’s nothing to say that those in power will…

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No Singular Brand of Feminism in Naomi Alderman’s ‘The Power’

in Fiction by

In this enthralling, dare we say feminist, prize of speculative fiction The Power, Naomi Alderman conceives a near future where the deadly power to electrify spirals from women’s collarbones, through their hands, effusing across the globe, forcing a new world order. Though published in 2016, interest in the book picks up non-stop speed around the world, particularly in the U.S., as it interprets the zeitgeist of heady power brandished, and condemned, under the many-colored banners of feminism. House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi’s historic eight-hour speech while wearing four-inch heels dominates headlines, a seemingly inspiring moment for women in politics. Yet, it competes with accusations of abuse against former White House staff secretary Rob Porter—the President siding with Porter tweeting, “Peoples…

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‘Cat Person’ and ‘Zola’: Two Viral Shorts, Two Different Reactions

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Spoilers for ‘Cat Person’ ahead! This week, a short story in The New Yorker took the Internet by storm. Cat Person, written by Kristen Roupenian, is about two individuals meeting, texting, and eventually going on a lackluster date. Told from the point-of-view of Margot, a 20-year-old college student, the piece encapsulates what it means to date as a young woman. Cat Person explores the fantasies, insecurities, and looming threat of danger that women, in general, face on the dating scene. Margot’s 34-year-old date, Robert, is also guilty of projecting his fantasies onto the dating experience, and by the end, he turns on Margot in a way that feels all too real for many women who took to Twitter to express their…

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Morgan Jerkins’ ‘This Will Be My Undoing’ is Timely Portrait of Womanhood in America

in Nonfiction by

This year, books pertaining to race, gender, sexuality and feminism are paving the way for some interesting discussions and perspectives on how we view human life in America. One of the most prolific of these to be released this year is Morgan Jerkins’ debut, This Will Be My Undoing: Living at the Intersection of Black, Female, and Feminist in (White) America. Jerkins’ collection of essays is a timely discourse on the treatment and experiences of Black women in this country. Named as the “one of the Most Anticipated Books of 2018” by Esquire, Elle, and Vogue, Jerkins’ book contains a collection of essays regarding topics such as feminism, misogyny, Black history and pop culture. The main question Jerkins answers in her…

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11 Must-Read Feminist Books from the Past 100 Years

in Nonfiction by

What does feminism mean to you? Over the years, the definition of the word “feminism” has changed. For the record, that definition, according to Webster’s Dictionary, is: “the belief that men and women should have equal opportunities.” That seems simple enough, but for some, feminism has become a controversial—even unnecessary concept. Whatever feminism means to you, it’s worth taking a look back at how and why the movement developed, beginning as far back as the early 1900s, and the writers and feminist books that continue to influence our lives today—whether we know it or not. With so much feminist literature out there, this list is not exhaustive. Add your go-to feminist book to the comments. Together We Rise, The Women’s March…

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Life After ‘Cat Person’: Why We Need Feminist Novels

in Nonfiction by

If you haven’t read the short by Kristen Roupenian, ‘Cat Person,’ which just went viral last week, you absolutely have to. Many women find themselves relating to her story, which is why the author sold her collection of short stories so that everyday people will get to experience her truthful writing with an impact, again and again! As you eagerly await the short story collection, there are some other novels being released in the upcoming weeks that follow women’s lives and honest subjects we never knew we needed to learn about until now, inclusive to all women: Black women, transgender, and gay. We all understand the importance and impact of feminism in our lives. Here are 10 feminist novels that…

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The Freedom to Love is Paramount in Ariana Mansour’s ‘He Never Deserved Me’

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For most American women, we cannot conceive of marrying a man we don’t love, much less marrying a man our parents and community chooses for us. Not to say that this doesn’t happen in some regions and/or faiths, or that it wasn’t a more common phenomenon in another time and place, but since the women’s liberation movement of the 1960s and the mainstreaming of modern feminism, American women have been fighting for respect; not just respect of our persons, but of our needs, desires, passions and our choices. We won’t always make the right choices as life is overwrought with bad mistakes that began with the purest of intentions. But, we should be allowed to make those mistakes in a…

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Feminists Unite: Literary Costumes Inspired by 6 Badass Women!

in Fiction by

Halloween is right around the corner, and it’s time to finally decide on a costume. We’ve been rolling around ideas for weeks, but still haven’t been able to land on the perfect choice. Not only do we want something clever and fun, but we also want to show off our feminist side by going as a strong female character who inspires and empowers us. Here at Booktrib, we like to turn to books for inspiration. And why not? There are tons of smart, strong women in literature to emulate this year. We’ve wracked our brains to round up some original ideas that we’re sure are going to be the hit of any party. Here they are, 6 of our favorite…

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Jennifer Mathieu on Feminism, ‘Moxie’, and Fighting Back

in Fiction by

BookTrib is partnering with Bookish to bring you more great content. Picking a favorite book can be tough for any reader, but we can’t deny that Jennifer Mathieu’s Moxie is high on our list. This young adult novel takes readers to an average high school where a quiet girl named Vivian decides that she’s done putting up with sexist behavior. Inspired by her mom’s punk rock zines from the 90s, Viv decides to start a feminist movement, encouraging other girls to join together, stand up, and fight back. Here, Mathieu talks about young feminists today, the importance of intersectionality, and why this book is a love letter to her students. Bookish: You dedicate this book to teens and women fighting for equality, but also to…

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Summer Reading Redemption: English Class Reads that Deserve Second Chances

in Fiction by

High school sucked, right? Totally. Anyway, remember all those books you had to read? Turns out some of them were pretty good! Overcome your pimply PTSD and revisit some classics you may have overlooked back in the day. Matt’s Take Hey, who remembers high school? Because I sure don’t. My terrible bouts of awkwardness and raging hormones made sure I blocked out the majority of those four years. But some memories just stick, like assigned readings, and getting rejected by cheerleading captain Joanna Michaels*. Damn, she was ice cold. If you were at all like me in high school, there were some books you enjoyed and some you flat-out hated. We enjoy doing things on our own time, not when…

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Who Run the World?! 7 Books for Women’s Equality Day

in Potpourri by

First thing’s first – here’s the soundtrack for this article:   On this glorious day, August 26, in the glorious year of 1920, the 19th Amendment to the United States Constitution was certified as law. For anyone not up on their Constitutional Amendments (YOU SHOULD BE), that’s the one that gave women the right to vote. So, to commemorate the date, we have Women’s Equality Day, a holiday that celebrates ladies getting a right we should have had from the very beginning. Women’s Equality Day is a well-intentioned holiday that’s still a bit touchy, mainly because the subject of women’s equality is still about as frustrating and divisive as it was in 1920. The gender wage gap is still a…

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Review: Alexandra Kleeman’s Brilliant Debut “You Too Can Have a Body Like Mine”

in Fiction by

Think of Alexandra Kleeman as an heir to Dave Eggers and Douglas Coupland, with a hefty dollop of Margaret Atwood thrown in. Her debut novel, You Too Can Have a Body Like Mine (Harper Collins; August 25, 2015), is a full-on postmodern satire bursting with biting commentary on women’s body image, consumerism and conformity. Our narrator, known only as A, lives in a shared suburban apartment. She and her roommate, B, are physically similar and emotionally dependent, egging each other on to paranoia and anorexia. They eat nothing but popsicles and oranges. A’s boyfriend, C, has a penchant for watching porn and mansplaining. A obsesses over every aspect of her body – whether her eyesight, makeup, posture, sexuality or perpetual…

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