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feminism

No Singular Brand of Feminism in Naomi Alderman’s ‘The Power’

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In this enthralling, dare we say feminist, prize of speculative fiction The Power, Naomi Alderman conceives a near future where the deadly power to electrify spirals from women’s collarbones, through their hands, effusing across the globe, forcing a new world order. Though published in 2016, interest in the book picks up non-stop speed around the world, particularly in the U.S., as it interprets the zeitgeist of heady power brandished, and condemned, under the many-colored banners of feminism. House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi’s historic eight-hour speech while wearing four-inch heels dominates headlines, a seemingly inspiring moment for women in politics. Yet, it competes with accusations of abuse against former White House staff secretary Rob Porter—the President siding with Porter tweeting, “Peoples…

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‘Cat Person’ and ‘Zola’: Two Viral Shorts, Two Different Reactions

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Spoilers for ‘Cat Person’ ahead! This week, a short story in The New Yorker took the Internet by storm. Cat Person, written by Kristen Roupenian, is about two individuals meeting, texting, and eventually going on a lackluster date. Told from the point-of-view of Margot, a 20-year-old college student, the piece encapsulates what it means to date as a young woman. Cat Person explores the fantasies, insecurities, and looming threat of danger that women, in general, face on the dating scene. Margot’s 34-year-old date, Robert, is also guilty of projecting his fantasies onto the dating experience, and by the end, he turns on Margot in a way that feels all too real for many women who took to Twitter to express their…

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Morgan Jerkins’ ‘This Will Be My Undoing’ is Timely Portrait of Womanhood in America

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This year, books pertaining to race, gender, sexuality and feminism are paving the way for some interesting discussions and perspectives on how we view human life in America. One of the most prolific of these to be released this year is Morgan Jerkins’ debut, This Will Be My Undoing: Living at the Intersection of Black, Female, and Feminist in (White) America. Jerkins’ collection of essays is a timely discourse on the treatment and experiences of Black women in this country. Named as the “one of the Most Anticipated Books of 2018” by Esquire, Elle, and Vogue, Jerkins’ book contains a collection of essays regarding topics such as feminism, misogyny, Black history and pop culture. The main question Jerkins answers in her…

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11 Must-Read Feminist Books from the Past 100 Years

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What does feminism mean to you? Over the years, the definition of the word “feminism” has changed. For the record, that definition, according to Webster’s Dictionary, is: “the belief that men and women should have equal opportunities.” That seems simple enough, but for some, feminism has become a controversial—even unnecessary concept. Whatever feminism means to you, it’s worth taking a look back at how and why the movement developed, beginning as far back as the early 1900s, and the writers and feminist books that continue to influence our lives today—whether we know it or not. With so much feminist literature out there, this list is not exhaustive. Add your go-to feminist book to the comments. Together We Rise, The Women’s March…

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Life After ‘Cat Person’: Why We Need Feminist Novels

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If you haven’t read the short by Kristen Roupenian, ‘Cat Person,’ which just went viral last week, you absolutely have to. Many women find themselves relating to her story, which is why the author sold her collection of short stories so that everyday people will get to experience her truthful writing with an impact, again and again! As you eagerly await the short story collection, there are some other novels being released in the upcoming weeks that follow women’s lives and honest subjects we never knew we needed to learn about until now, inclusive to all women: Black women, transgender, and gay. We all understand the importance and impact of feminism in our lives. Here are 10 feminist novels that…

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The Freedom to Love is Paramount in Ariana Mansour’s ‘He Never Deserved Me’

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For most American women, we cannot conceive of marrying a man we don’t love, much less marrying a man our parents and community chooses for us. Not to say that this doesn’t happen in some regions and/or faiths, or that it wasn’t a more common phenomenon in another time and place, but since the women’s liberation movement of the 1960s and the mainstreaming of modern feminism, American women have been fighting for respect; not just respect of our persons, but of our needs, desires, passions and our choices. We won’t always make the right choices as life is overwrought with bad mistakes that began with the purest of intentions. But, we should be allowed to make those mistakes in a…

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Feminists Unite: Literary Costumes Inspired by 6 Badass Women!

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Halloween is right around the corner, and it’s time to finally decide on a costume. We’ve been rolling around ideas for weeks, but still haven’t been able to land on the perfect choice. Not only do we want something clever and fun, but we also want to show off our feminist side by going as a strong female character who inspires and empowers us. Here at Booktrib, we like to turn to books for inspiration. And why not? There are tons of smart, strong women in literature to emulate this year. We’ve wracked our brains to round up some original ideas that we’re sure are going to be the hit of any party. Here they are, 6 of our favorite…

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Jennifer Mathieu on Feminism, ‘Moxie’, and Fighting Back

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BookTrib is partnering with Bookish to bring you more great content. Picking a favorite book can be tough for any reader, but we can’t deny that Jennifer Mathieu’s Moxie is high on our list. This young adult novel takes readers to an average high school where a quiet girl named Vivian decides that she’s done putting up with sexist behavior. Inspired by her mom’s punk rock zines from the 90s, Viv decides to start a feminist movement, encouraging other girls to join together, stand up, and fight back. Here, Mathieu talks about young feminists today, the importance of intersectionality, and why this book is a love letter to her students. Bookish: You dedicate this book to teens and women fighting for equality, but also to…

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Summer Reading Redemption: English Class Reads that Deserve Second Chances

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High school sucked, right? Totally. Anyway, remember all those books you had to read? Turns out some of them were pretty good! Overcome your pimply PTSD and revisit some classics you may have overlooked back in the day. Matt’s Take Hey, who remembers high school? Because I sure don’t. My terrible bouts of awkwardness and raging hormones made sure I blocked out the majority of those four years. But some memories just stick, like assigned readings, and getting rejected by cheerleading captain Joanna Michaels*. Damn, she was ice cold. If you were at all like me in high school, there were some books you enjoyed and some you flat-out hated. We enjoy doing things on our own time, not when…

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Who Run the World?! 7 Books for Women’s Equality Day

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First thing’s first – here’s the soundtrack for this article:   On this glorious day, August 26, in the glorious year of 1920, the 19th Amendment to the United States Constitution was certified as law. For anyone not up on their Constitutional Amendments (YOU SHOULD BE), that’s the one that gave women the right to vote. So, to commemorate the date, we have Women’s Equality Day, a holiday that celebrates ladies getting a right we should have had from the very beginning. Women’s Equality Day is a well-intentioned holiday that’s still a bit touchy, mainly because the subject of women’s equality is still about as frustrating and divisive as it was in 1920. The gender wage gap is still a…

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Review: Alexandra Kleeman’s Brilliant Debut “You Too Can Have a Body Like Mine”

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Think of Alexandra Kleeman as an heir to Dave Eggers and Douglas Coupland, with a hefty dollop of Margaret Atwood thrown in. Her debut novel, You Too Can Have a Body Like Mine (Harper Collins; August 25, 2015), is a full-on postmodern satire bursting with biting commentary on women’s body image, consumerism and conformity. Our narrator, known only as A, lives in a shared suburban apartment. She and her roommate, B, are physically similar and emotionally dependent, egging each other on to paranoia and anorexia. They eat nothing but popsicles and oranges. A’s boyfriend, C, has a penchant for watching porn and mansplaining. A obsesses over every aspect of her body – whether her eyesight, makeup, posture, sexuality or perpetual…

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The Notorious RBG: We love the new rock star feminist!

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Ruth Bader Ginsburg has done some amazing things. But prior to the current craze that’s sweeping the Internet, putting this woman’s name and rock ‘n roll in the same sentence was usually part of a joke. Oh, ha-ha, a societal and political leader elevated to the Supreme Court, who doesn’t exactly sport the latest fashions, is a what? A rock star? Please. Oh, but she is. The legendary feminism leader, and one of the most critical figures in American history, is heating up the digital space. She’s got it all rolling now; there’s a new biopic starring Natalie Portman, her well-documented role in the gay marriage issue, and that glove. Wait, a glove? This picture showed up in TIME magazine and added fuel to…

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Amy Schumer might kill The Bachelorette

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Perspective is everything. It started when comedian Amy Schumer (of Inside Amy Schumer) went on ABC and interacted – in her typically hilarious, tongue-in-cheek way – with Bachelorette Kaitlyn Bristowe and the bachelors. The clip is well worth seeing, simply because Schumer brings such a different flavor to the disintegrating show. Immediately after, ABC senior vice president of alternative series, specials, and late-night programming Robert Mills (how do you fit that on a business card?) gave Schumer an informal invitation on Twitter: OK here is the official offer to @amyschumer to become #TheBachelorette. Just say yes and we start tomorrow. #DraftAmy — Robert Mills (@Millsy11374) May 26, 2015 Unsurprisingly, this kicked off a firestorm of comments in social media and as People summarized,…

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I’m Glad I Did: Songwriter Cynthia Weil recreates her early years in the business

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Rules are meant to be broken. Or at least that’s what Grammy-winning songwriter Cynthia Weil proposes in her latest young adult novel, I’m Glad I Did, a book that rides on the back of the Peace Train, giving voice to issues of racism, sexism and war. It was 1961 when Weil first walked down the street toward the Brill Building in the heart of New York City. She could not have known at the time that this was the beginning of one wild career at Aldon Music. Flanked with black marble pillars and a blazing brass edifice, Weil crossed the music building’s threshold and took those first steps into songwriting that would one day lead her to become only the…

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International author Bina Shah discusses Sindh, Sufism and storytelling

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The original title of my novel A Season For Martyrs was meant to be Children of Sindh. Sindh is one of the four provinces that make up Pakistan, and it’s where I was born and where I live today. When I sat down to write the book, I envisioned an epic narrative that encompassed tales from Sindh’s history, combining them with a modern thread that took place from October to December 2007, the last three months of Benazir Bhutto’s life. In this way I hoped to tell the story of Sindh’s importance to Pakistan’s history, and how its people – its children – are affected and influenced today by that weighty history. I decided that I would begin the story…

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