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Ernest Hemingway

Previously Unpublished Hemingway Story

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Having just celebrated the 74th anniversary of the Liberation of Paris, another celebration of Paris took place earlier this month when The Strand Magazine ran a previously unpublished story by Ernest Hemingway with post-war Paris as the focal point. A Room on the Garden Side is “an earthy, poignant sketch that takes place in Hemingway’s favorite hotel in Paris, the Ritz, at the end of World War II,” writes Strand Managing Editor Andrew F. Gulli.  “The narrator, Robert (also nicknamed Papa) and a group of irregular soldiers who fought their way into the city, newly liberated from the Nazis, are due to leave Paris the next day.” The narrator, explains Gulli, is in a room chatting books, life, love, death,…

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The Top 5 Greatest Author Feuds

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All authors are protective of their work, and we can’t imagine what it’s like to go head-to-head with another author who doesn’t like your work and has no problem telling you so. But not only has this happened, there have been feuds between some pretty famous authors, including literary greats Ernest Hemingway and William Faulkner. Take a look at the top five author feuds in recent history: they might just surprise you! Sign up NOW for exclusive BookTrib news, interviews and giveaways!

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Kathleen Hill’s Favorite Memoirs To Help Get You Through the Last Days of Our Writing Contest

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Inspired by an interview and memoir written by Kathleen Hill, BookTrib is hosting our first writing contest where anyone with a story to tell can write  for a chance to be a 2018 BookTrib Contributor.  Hill, who is also a professor of writing at Sarah Lawrence College will be judging the contest  along with Walt Gragg, author of The Red Line, and James R. Hannibal, author of The Fourth Ruby. We know many of you are looking forward to entering your work an need inspiration, but others, still, just want a list of recommended memoir to add to your collection. Here, we can oblige everyone with a list of suggested memoirs from Hill’s own personal collection along with her observations and recollections. Autobiography of…

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Wednesday Wisdom Amazing Tips for Writers from the Most Prolific of All Time

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People always ask me what my writing “process” is. If they knew, they wouldn’t believe me, most times it involves just sitting alone and listening to my own thoughts. Rrely does it ever involve me sitting in front of a blank screen on my computer; if I’m typing, it is already written, I am just transcribing the pages in my head. About 90 percent of what I write has been written in my dreams and that is because I spend about 90 percent of my time thinking about writing. My inspiration comes from a variety of sources, most are just random occurrences and rather than keeping my thoughts and opinions about these to myself, I share them with you. Writing…

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#WednesdayWisdom for Writers from Some of the Most Prolific Writers of All Time

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People always ask me what my writing “process” is. If they knew, they wouldn’t believe me, most times it involves just sitting alone and listening to my own thoughts. Rrely does it ever involve me sitting in front of a blank screen on my computer; if I’m typing, it is already written, I am just transcribing the pages in my head. About 90 percent of what I write has been written in my dreams and that is because I spend about 90 percent of my time thinking about writing. My inspiration comes from a variety of sources, most are just random occurrences and rather than keeping my thoughts and opinions about these to myself, I share them with you. Writing…

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Hemingway to Capote: Watching Our Favorite Writers Come to Life On-Screen

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Writers have a long history of showing up as characters in films. Sometimes those writers are real people interacting with history (like Hemingway!), and sometimes they’re made up characters, showing us exactly how Hollywood imagines the concept of the writer. Regardless, these writers usually have certain traits in common: they’re often tortured by their art, they prefer to be isolated from society in some way, and they LOVE whiskey. Of course, these are broad generalizations, and sometimes we do see writers who are mentally stable, well adjusted, and finding success without also finding a drinking problem – though it’s admittedly pretty rare. But no matter how a writer is portrayed, we’re always happy to see them on the screen. It…

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Ernest Hemingway’s Great Grandson, Robert Hemingway, Discovers Himself Through Writing

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A creative mind is more often than not palpable; you can hold it in your hand, hear it through your ears, or read it with your eyes. Where painters or musicians express their creativity through canvas or a music sheet, a writer will pour their creativity onto the page, enchanting each word and building deep and complex worlds. This is the path I have chosen, and I’m not alone. Every writer, regardless of genre, who may not even have a published piece, will have an impact on the lives of others as long as the writing is shared. Inspiration can spread like a wildfire; let the pages be a kindling that will never burn out. When I was younger, and…

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Summer Reading Redemption: English Class Reads that Deserve Second Chances

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High school sucked, right? Totally. Anyway, remember all those books you had to read? Turns out some of them were pretty good! Overcome your pimply PTSD and revisit some classics you may have overlooked back in the day. Matt’s Take Hey, who remembers high school? Because I sure don’t. My terrible bouts of awkwardness and raging hormones made sure I blocked out the majority of those four years. But some memories just stick, like assigned readings, and getting rejected by cheerleading captain Joanna Michaels*. Damn, she was ice cold. If you were at all like me in high school, there were some books you enjoyed and some you flat-out hated. We enjoy doing things on our own time, not when…

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St. Patrick’s Day: 4 Literary Pubs You Should Have on Your Travel List

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Every year on the weekend before St. Patrick’s Day I walk a few blocks from my home to our town’s annual parade with an Irish coffee in hand. My friends and I catch the parade route starting at the very beginning and follow it all the way downtown where the crowd thickens and a sea of folks decked out in green spill out of the doors of every pub. It’s always a lively time and definitely gets everyone in the spirit of St. Paddy’s day. This year, as I bar hopped along the festive parade route, I wondered about the history of many of the bars in my hometown. My literary background caused me to wonder which famous authors drank…

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Fabulous literary spring break destinations

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I was swapping ideas one night with a friend about where we would go for an inspirational weekend of no-costs-barred fun, if we could. Winter was dragging. The college kids at the school where he taught were starting to plan their spring break and we were way too old for that. “Someplace where writers would go,” I said. “Someplace strange, but great.” I didn’t want a beach trip or some international adventure. I just wanted to be inspired and see something new. My friend had just told me about the day he’d spent in France when he had accidentally found himself touring Gertrude Stein’s famous apartment, which had been the epicenter of the literary salon scene in 1920s Paris. In…

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What would Hemingway eat? A menu for a Moveable Feast

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I realized, as I worked my way through Ernest Hemingway’s A Moveable Feast, that he titled it so because his time in Paris was an ongoing banquet of social activities, incessant writing, and literal feasting and imbibing from one café to the next. It was also most apparent to me that, though he had already fallen into the arms of another woman when he wrote this memoir, he had truly loved his first wife, Hadley. Regret filters through when he speaks of their tender years together. So much so that I wondered if writing it could have been his way of telling her of his regret. But above all, as a gastronaut, I found the descriptions of food and drink…

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Zelda and Mrs. Hemingway: Literary Wives Take Center Stage

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Zelda Fitzgerald died 66 years ago to the day, in 1948. She had been a patient at Highland Mental Hospital in Asheville, North Carolina, off and on for nearly a dozen years. On March 10, fire spread through the hospital and burned nine women alive, including Zelda, who was on a locked ward awaiting electroshock treatment. As much for her turbulent lifestyle as for her horrific death, the wife of F. Scott Fitzgerald continues to serve as a tragic muse for contemporary novelists.  Therese Anne Fowler brings to life in wondrous historical detail Zelda’s Alabama upbringing, Scott’s early courtship, and her ambitions for writing and dancing in her novel Z: A Novel of Zelda Fitzgerald, now out in paperback. This…

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