Tag archive

emotional intelligence

The Five Self-Help Books That Rocked My World

in Non-Fiction by

Writing a book in the personal development/self-help field is daunting; I should know, I wrote one! The one thing I learned is that there is a fine line between self-help and total bullshit. What’s even more interesting is that line is different for everyone. Below, find my top five self-development books (that for me held the least amount of BS). Emotional Intelligence, Dan Goleman I was 23 just beginning my career. The company I worked for offered the option to continue our education and rewarded us for it. “Wait, so if I read this book I get points towards a monetary raise? Ummmm… sure!” The first book on the list was Dan Goldman’s Emotional Intelligence. When I was growing up…

Keep Reading

Spartan Up! How The Art of Charm Saved Jordan Harbinger’s Life

in Non-Fiction by

Jordan Harbinger is the founder of The Art of Charm and knows firsthand just how important it is to use your emotional intelligence as a way to advance in your career and possibly even save your life. The life coach sat down with Spartan Up’s Joe De Sena, Founder and CEO of Spartan Race, to talk about how he escaped after being detained in Serbia and why kicking certain bad habits is the only way to live a fulfilling and successful life. For more, watch the Podcast above. ABOUT SPARTAN UP! THE PODCAST: Every day, Joe De Sena, founder and CEO of Spartan Race and a New York Times bestselling author, inspires millions of people all over the world to get off the…

Keep Reading

Dear Bosses: Yelling at your employees doesn’t work

in Potpourri by

As an employer, you want your employees to be happy and successful.  In point of fact, you NEED them to be happy and successful. But nobody is perfect and your workers are bound to make mistakes.  How you respond is critical, and you will find that certain approaches work better than others.  Shrieking, “what the hell is wrong with you?!” is a gut reaction but is it productive? What’s the long-term result?  It’s a point of interest for Stanford University neurosurgeon Dr. James Doty, who believes compassion – as opposed to frustration and remonstrance – is key. As Emma Seppälä outlines in the Harvard Business Review, Doty’s tips for employers highlight curiosity and interest. This is why emotional intelligence (E.Q.)…

Keep Reading

Go to Top