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Early Bird Books

Reese and Kerry to Adapt ‘Little Fires Everywhere’ for TV

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Celeste Ng’s bestselling novel about trouble in suburbia is set to become a television series. It’s been a little over a year since we obsessed over Reese Witherspoon’s adaption of Big Little Lies, and now the star is bringing a second suburban drama to the small screen. Last week, Witherspoon announced that, in partnership with Scandal’s Kerry Washington, she will develop Celeste Ng’s Little Fires Everywhere into a television series. Both actresses are the founders of the Hello Sunshine and Simpson Street production companies, respectively. This is not a drill 🚨 @reesewitherspoon has teamed up with @kerrywashington to turn @pronounced_ing’s #LittleFiresEverywhere (our September Book Pick!) into a limited series!!! 🔥 Tap the link in bio for all the details… and don’t forget to read…

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Early Bird Books: E.R. Braithwaite Wrangles Unruly High School Students in To Sir, With Love

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By treating his students as equals, a schoolteacher creates a unique bond with his class. As a black man in the 1950s, a time during which racism was rampant, the odds were against E.R. Braithwaite. Few people expected him to succeed as an engineer, much less as a high school teacher in London’s East End. His all-white students were disrespectful at best, and delinquent at worst—an impossible gaggle of undereducated, hormonal teenagers who had no respect for his authority. And yet, despite these bumpy beginnings, Braithwaite was able to turn things around by using a simple but unusual tactic: He would treat his students as adults. Braithwaite wrote of his experiences in his autobiographical novel, To Sir, With Love, in 1959. Eight…

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Early Bird Books: Viola Davis Pens New Adventure for Corduroy the Bear

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Corduroy Takes a Bow will be published in September for the series’ 50th anniversary. She wins Oscars! She gets away with murder! She…writes books? In a recent statement to PEOPLE, award-winning actress Viola Davis discussed her authorial debut: a new installment in the classic Corduroy series. Titled Corduroy Takes a Bow, the upcoming book sees the titular bear visit the theater with his human companion, Lisa, for the first time. Davis took to Twitter to reveal the cover and fall publication date, which will mark the series’ 50th anniversary. For Davis, the book was more than a cute story for kids—it offered much-needed representation in the mostly-white world of children’s literature. In what she referred to as a childhood of “abject poverty and dysfunction,” a young Davis found…

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Early Bird Books: 8 Books for Fans of Little Women

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If you’re missing the March sisters, these books are for you. In 1868, author Louisa May Alcott gave us one of the most beloved novels of all time: Little Women. The book tells the story of the four March sisters: Beautiful and responsible Meg, headstrong and intelligent Jo, sweet Beth, and Amy—the baby. Set during the Civil War, the four teenage girls live with their mother Marmee, as their father is serving as a pastor in the war. Alcott loosely based Little Women on her own life, and went on to write two sequels: Little Men and Jo’s Boys. Throughout her life, the author wrote several other novels, but none were ever as popular as the family saga she wrote towards the beginning of her career. If…

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Early Bird Books: 6 Must-Read Historical Fiction Books by Rumer Godden

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The prolific British author deserves a place on your bookshelf. Rumer Godden (born Margaret Rumer Godden) authored more than 60 books in her lifetime. Most notable is her novel Black Narcissus, which was adapted into a 1947 film starring  Deborah Kerr. The British author was born in Sussex in 1907, but grew up in what is now known as Bangladesh. Though she was sent to England for schooling, her parents brought her back to India at the start of World War I. Before writing novels, Godden trained as a dancer and even opened a dance studio in Calcutta in 1925. While still running the studio, she published her first novel in 1936 and continued to write—often basing her books on real-life experience. Interested in…

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Before He Was Muhammad Ali: The Amateur Boxer Who Won Gold at the 1960 Olympics

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The boxer won the Light Heavyweight gold medal at the 1960 Summer Olympics in Rome when he was just 18 years old. Early on in his career, Muhammad Ali went by his given name: Cassius Clay. As one of the most significant athletes of the 20th century, Ali has held his fair share of titles—notably winning heavyweight titles at the age of 22—but one of his first was that of Olympic gold medalist. During the 1960 Summer Olympic Games in Rome, Ali beat out Polish boxer Zbigniew Pietrzykowski for the gold before turning professional later that year. But there’s much more to Ali than just his career as a boxer. In addition to his athletic accomplishments, Ali was also an…

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11 Unforgettable Female Friendships in Literature

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Celebrate the unsung heroine of books: friendship. Though Valentine’s Day typically evokes the idea of celebrating romantic relationships, it is slowly but surely evolving to include friendship as well, with the cheesy, yet appropriate, identifier: Galentine’s Day. Regardless of if you’ll be spending this year with a significant other, these literary female friendships will inspire you to be thankful for those devoted, trustworthy friends who always have your back. In literature, shared experiences—be it living under the same harsh conditions or experiencing love for the first time—form the foundation for female friendship. Whether the story takes place 200 years in the past or here in the 21st century, between mothers and daughters or college girlfriends, one thing remains true in…

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Early Bird Books: In Conversation with Alice Walker

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The author of “The Color Purple” reads three of her poems and answers reader questions about her work, life, and views on society. On February 9, 1944, Pulitzer Prize-winning author Alice Walker was born in Georgia. Walker lived under Jim Crow laws that were present during that time in the South. But her parents resisted such segregation, refusing to subject their children to working in the fields for white plantation owners. Growing up listening to stories her grandfather would tell, Walker began writing when she was just eight years old. She published her first poetry collection, Once, in 1968, and her debut novel The Third Life of Grange Copeland in 1970. In 1982, she published her award-winning novel The Color Purple. The iconic book…

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For MaddAddam Fans: Another Margaret Atwood Adaptation Is In The Works

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Paramount TV has acquired the rights to the MaddAddam Trilogy, a dystopian series by “The Handmaid’s Tale” author.   Just last week, Variety revealed that the MaddAddam Trilogy is joining the ranks of anticipated Margaret Atwood adaptations. Like Hulu’s Emmy-winning drama, The Handmaid’s Tale,and Netflix’s Alias Grace, the three novels—Oryx and Crake, The Year of the Flood, and MaddAddam—will soon be venturing to the small screen. Paramount TV, which was formerly Spike TV and is currently the home of Waco, has secured the rights. The MaddAddam Trilogy adaptation will likely be as riveting—and as frighteningly plausible—as Atwood’s other works that have already received the small screen treatment. Set in a dystopian future, the last human on Earth, “Snowman” née Jimmy, recounts the the fall of humanity while…

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Early Bird Books: 13 Books Our Favorite Celebrities Love

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Stars—they read like us! We’ll be the first to admit that we love a bit of celebrity gossip—especially when it involves what’s on people’s shelves. Lately, stars like Reese Witherspoon and Emma Watson have been hopping on the book club train, selecting titles each month and leading thoughtful reading discussions with their fans. It’s been a great way to highlight the latest debut authors, or bring old, forgotten gems back into the limelight. We’re all about using fame to the benefit of a good book. Below, you’ll find recommendations that come straight from the mouths of our favorite celebrities. From childhood classics to later-in-life discoveries, these are the reads that have made lasting impressions on Academy Award winners, singers, and more. Tom Hanks Blood on…

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11 Must-Read Feminist Books from the Past 100 Years

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What does feminism mean to you? Over the years, the definition of the word “feminism” has changed. For the record, that definition, according to Webster’s Dictionary, is: “the belief that men and women should have equal opportunities.” That seems simple enough, but for some, feminism has become a controversial—even unnecessary concept. Whatever feminism means to you, it’s worth taking a look back at how and why the movement developed, beginning as far back as the early 1900s, and the writers and feminist books that continue to influence our lives today—whether we know it or not. With so much feminist literature out there, this list is not exhaustive. Add your go-to feminist book to the comments. Together We Rise, The Women’s March…

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20 of the Best New York Times Notable Books

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Every December, the New York Times releases their annual “Notable Books” list, which celebrates the year’s greatest literary achievements. Studded with big names and remarkable first-time authors, it represents the cream-of-the-crop in literary talent, and serves as a touchstone for what—or whom—belongs in everyone’s TBR piles. Earlier this month, the Times announced their 2017 honorees. Among the 100 chosen were Lidia Yuknavitch’s The Book of Joan and Naomi Alderman’s The Power—both of which echo the year’s biggest pop culture talking point, The Handmaid’s Tale. Recent award-winners also made the list: Lincoln in the Bardo (Man Booker Prize), Sing, Unburied, Sing (National Book Award, Fiction), and The Future is History (National Book Award, Nonfifction) all earned spots. At the same time,…

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‘Pride and Prejudice’ Gets a Modern Makeover in ABC’s ‘Eligible’

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Last week, ABC committed to a pilot episode of Eligible, an adaptation of Curtis Sittenfeld’s Pride and Prejudice-inspired bestseller. Two CW alums and I. Marelene King, the showrunner of Pretty Little Liars, will work behind the camera to cast modern magic onto everyone’s favorite literary couple. Premiere date and casting announcements are still forthcoming. via GIPHY Lizzie Bennet and her brooding beau have made several trips to the screen throughout the past few decades. Most famously, Colin Firth played Darcy in the 1995 BBC miniseries before returning to the role in the more loosely based Bridget Jones’ Diary. Since Keira Knightley’s turn as Lizzie in the 2005 Oscar-nominated film, the Austen classic has also found its way to YouTube before…

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Your Next TV Obsession: PBS’ ‘The Great American Read’

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BookTrib is partnering with Early Bird Books to bring you more great content, including this article on the latest and greatest television series on PBS: “The Great American Read.” In an announcement that set our bookish hearts a-flutter, PBS revealed the latest addition to their television line-up: “The Great American Read.” Slated to air throughout the summer of 2018, the show will explore our beloved literary treasures (as chosen, in part, by a committee of literary professionals) as it leads a nationwide search for America’s favorite read. In other words: it’s the bookworm’s answer to the Super Bowl. Kicking things off is a two-hour premiere that will feature notable figures—from famous literati and Hollywood stars to newscasters and sports icons—as they champion the titles that…

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Frightened and Flustered: The Books You Read Too Young

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BookTrib is partnering with Early Bird Books to bring you more great content, including this article about some of your favorite novels as a teenager. Read on for more! A few weeks ago, an Early Bird Books meeting devolved into a passionate discussion about the books we stuffed under our mattresses, read by flashlight, and bought with our weekly allowances. Hilarity ensued. But after realizing our souls were similarly (and eternally) corrupted by Flowers in the Attic, we quickly realized we wanted to hear your answers, too. We were so excited to see your responses—yes, we did read all of them!—and hear about your innocent acts of bookish rebellion. While Judy Blume, VC Andrews, and Peyton Place seemed to have ruffled the most pre-tween feathers, there were a couple…

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An Excerpt of Joan Didion’s ‘Play It As It Lays’: Heart of the American Dream

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BookTrib is partnering with Early Bird Books to bring you more great content, including this article and excerpt from Joan Didion’s Play It As It Lays. Read on for more! An excerpt from the literary icon’s novel about loneliness and life’s unanswerable questions. The name Joan Didion is synonymous with a lot of things: the West Coast, a barely-there smile, a distanced but prescient prose. In fact, it’s impossible to read a line from, say, Slouching Towards Bethlehem without knowing exactly who you’re reading—and yet Didion herself has always remained something of an enigma. Though mostly known for her nonfiction, she’s the author of several screenplays and novels. Her fiction debut came in 1963 with Run, River, a book that was edited by her then-future husband,…

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