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Dark Humor

Sam Hooker’s “Peril in the Old Country” Is The Perfect, Dark Comedy Escape

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Rare is the author that writes like Sam Hooker. His latest book, Peril in the Old Country, draws the reader into a kaleidoscope of absurdist humor, stunning imagery, and a fantastical plot. Hooker is an expert when it comes to dark humor, and it clearly shows. In a land where rules are everything – also known as the Old Country – Sloot Peril is an accountant who’s really just trying to do the best he can and stay in the realm of mediocrity for as long as possible. That, unfortunately for him, is now what happens. Instead, he fixes an accounting error, gets invited to a high-class dinner party he doesn’t belong at, and finds out that he’s actually from…

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‘Brooklyn Nine-Nine’ Premiered on FOX: Re-live it with Our Reads for Rosa

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With her dark hair and pink highlights, she’s mysterious, secretive, and highly intelligent. Last night, Rosa Diaz and the cast of Brooklyn Nine-Nine returned to FOX. After last season’s twisting finale that no one saw coming, we’re all looking forward to seeing what Jake and Rosa will be up to! Despite the predicament that they find themselves in now, we’re sure it will be every bit as hilarious as the previous seasons. Season 5 of Brooklyn Nine-Nine returns to Fox on September 26th. Played for four seasons now by Stephanie Beatriz, Rosa is not only the toughest on the show, but notoriously hard to read. While we do know some things about her (she really likes the movie Robocop, and believes everyone should have their own…

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Author Emily Schultz Answers One Question about ‘The Blondes’

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It’s a beautiful spring day in the city as people stroll through the parks. Families are buying fresh greens from the farmer’s market, workers are hustling up and down Main St. to get to work. All seems well and good, until every blonde woman becomes a homicidal maniac. No, seriously. Emily Schultz uses allegorical horror and dark humor to show that nothing is really as it seems in her novel, The Blondes (Picador, paperback, April 12). Named one of NPR’s Best Books of 2015, Schultz comments on social constructs placed on women, like the need to be attractive and docile to male counterparts. Because her novel has such a wild and disturbing premise, we asked Schultz where she thinks horror fits into popular culture. Here’s her thoughts: Question: While The…

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