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Coming of Age

Steve Jobs’ Daughter Finds Her Own Voice in New Memoir

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If you haven’t read Lisa Brennan-Job’s memoir “Small Fry” (Grove Press) yet, you will likely hear about it because Lisa’s father was Steve Jobs, the founder of Apple.  But this is not a biography of Steve Jobs. Rather, it is a portrait of growing up in California in the eighties and one woman’s quest to understand her family, her place in that family and her place in the world. The outline of her story is relatively well known. Mr. Jobs fathered her at 23, then denied paternity despite a DNA match and gave little in financial or emotional support until later in her life. Surrounded by complicated relationships Lisa spends much of her childhood and adolescence seeking love and acceptance. Despite…

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Political Groundbreaking Governor’s Journey

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Timing is everything, whether in the political arena or the literary arena. The most significant political decision I ever had to make was whether and when to run for governor of Vermont after Gov. Richard Snelling announced he would not run for another term, leaving an open seat. I was serving my second term as Lieutenant Governor, a natural steppingstone to the governorship. I decided to take the plunge and announced my candidacy in the fall of 1981. I had the experience and the confidence to enter the race, but I would be breaking new ground as the first female Vermont governor. I had been chair of the most powerful committee that controlled the state budget.  Many bills, such as…

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Tall Poppies Review: Freedom From a Fractured Family

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Fractured family, deadly secrets, and a woman on the run in L.A.   I’m a sucker for broken families–well, stories about them, anyway. Throw in secrets, especially L.A. secrets, and I’m in with both feet.   Most of the cast in Fallout Girl (Blue Crow Publishing) are twenty-somethings. It’s the age of becoming: choosing a career and a place to live, figuring out what sort of a person you want to be and who you want to be with. It’s like being a teenager, only this time the choices you make are for real. But twenty-something is still young. The best thing about being young is believing you can replace your supremely messed-up family with a group of friends. The worst…

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Here’s This Week’s AuthorBuzz: Free Books and So Much More!

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Author Buzz - November 2

Dear Reader, See what this week’s authors have to say! In each AuthorBuzz note you’ll receive invitations to join contests, get free books, bookplates or bookmarks, read personal stories, and more. Dear Reader, In the early 1990s Austin, Texas two young lovers move in together and open a cafe and chase the American dream, only to be besieged by their own pasts, drugs, and New Orleans mobsters. As the plot unfolds the story becomes increasingly sinister. Over the course of little more than a week the couple must find a way to protect each other and all they are struggling for or lose everything. Kirkus Review called Riverside “A steamy tale and beguiling thriller, with plenty of local color and…

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Talking Georgia Clark’s ‘The Regulars’: What’s So Bad about Being…Regular?

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Let’s face it, being a girl is hard. Deciding what to wear and then if that clothing fits your apple or pear body shape is not always enjoyable. Answering the question: do I have too much makeup on or not enough, is typically a rhetorical question, because is there ever really an answer? The list goes on and on. In a world where we are told to “just be ourselves,” there sure seems to be a lot of pressure on us ladies, from the “pretty” Snapchat filter to our Instagram news feeds filled with selfies of contouring celebrities, it’s no wonder where Georgia Clark found her inspiration for her latest witty and sexy novel, The Regulars (Emily Bestler Books, August 2, 2016). In Clark’s debut in adult fiction, Evie,…

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