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American Library Association

‘Anatomy of a Miracle:’ Too Good to Be True?

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After returning to Biloxi, Mississippi a veteran paraplegic from a horrific event in Afghanistan, Cameron Harris lives with his sister Tanya and spends a lot of time drinking, while managing to get around in a wheelchair. From the death of his mother, to the damaging hurricane and the war, Cameron has suffered his share. But one day while waiting for Tanya in the convenience store parking lot, he just stands up and starts to walk.  Was it a miracle, or was there a medical explanation? After a Facebook post about what had taken place goes viral, the local and national media bombard Cameron with questions related to his recovery. Christians believe this was a miracle and proof of God and…

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Bonding Over Books with Actress Sarah Jessica Parker

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The book world can be a kind and caring place. Authors are supportive to each other and many enjoy engaging with their readers. Book groups connect people to each other allowing them to discuss the stories authors write, current events and personal life. Books can bring people together from all over the world, highlighting issues, relationships and perspectives, binding us to each other. This appreciation of literature and the excitement over reading is what created an opportunity for me to spend some time bonding with Sarah Jessica Parker. I was thrilled to have the unique opportunity to discuss authors and books with her earlier this month and there was no shortage of words between us once we got down to…

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PODCAST: Authors Marguerite Elisofon and Ann Martin Talk ‘Rain Reign’ and Autism Awareness

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Author of the memoir My Picture Perfect Family (Central Park Publishers, 2016) Marguerite Elisofon chronicles the true story of raising twins in New York City and the journey that takes place following their daughter’s diagnoses on the Autism Spectrum. She sat down in with novelist Ann Martin to talk about her book Rain Reign (ALA Notable Children’s Books, 2014), in which the story is narrated by a young girl on the spectrum.   About the Authors About Marguerite Elisofon: Marguerite Elisofon is a New York City writer and the author of My Picture Perfect Family, a memoir about how her family navigated life with a child on the autistic spectrum before the internet and support groups existed. She also blogs about parenting young adults and disability…

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Smart Reads: 3 Books for Banned Books Week

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We’re closing out Banned Books Week (September 27-October 3) by honoring three of the most challenged and banned books in 2014 as this week’s Smart Reads. Even though our right to read anything we like is guaranteed by the First Amendment of the American Constitution, there have always been members of the community who take exception to the content of certain books. Reasons for banning books have varied. Most frequently cited are offensive language, sexually explicit content, violence, controversial issues (a highly subjective term) and being unsuitable for its targeted age group. But as any book loving parent knows, much of this depends on the individual reader. And what budding adolescent hasn’t read a forbidden adult novel under the covers…

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Free For All: The first major documentary about libraries needs your help

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A library is like a literary Shangri-la to a book lover. The lobby teems with children skirting around their parents’ feet eagerly waiting to check out their favorite books. Tweens dive into comfy chairs to lose themselves in the latest YA novel. High school students scratch their pencils on piles of homework in the quiet section as aspiring writers tap away on laptops. Elderly patrons get help with their taxes or are shown how to use the computers. And librarians pass among them, checking on this tender and diverse community. What would America be without its public libraries? Contrary to popular belief, more people use their local library than ever before, and yet libraries are endangered by drastic budget cuts,…

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Are you there, Judy? It’s us, your fans

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As National Library Week draws to a close, BookTrib had the pleasure of talking to bestselling authors Laura Lippman and Megan Abbott about the importance of libraries and especially about the role this year’s Honorary Chair, Judy Blume, in their lives as writers and readers. Lippman’s current novel, After I’m Gone, is out now and Abbott’s next book, The Fever, will be out in June. When did you get your first library card? Do you still have it? Laura Lippman: My first library card was earned at the Garrison branch of the Baltimore City library system (aka the Enoch Pratt) after I learned to write my name, a la Rufus Moffat. I think you had to surrender the old one…

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How will YOU celebrate National Library Week?

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April 13th marks the first day of National Library Week, a celebration sponsored by the American Library Association that has been observed since 1958. The week-long celebration is aimed at promoting the use and support of libraries. According to the “State of America’s Libraries Report” released last year during National Library Week, 53% of Americans reported visiting a library or book mobile in the past year. Whether you count yourself among those 53% or not, this week is a good time to step back and appreciate what our public libraries have to offer. Robert Dawson’s new book, The Public Library: A Photographic Essay (Princeton Architectural Press, April) is a good place to start. The book includes photographs taken by Dawson over…

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