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Alice Walker

11 Unforgettable Female Friendships in Literature

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Celebrate the unsung heroine of books: friendship. Though Valentine’s Day typically evokes the idea of celebrating romantic relationships, it is slowly but surely evolving to include friendship as well, with the cheesy, yet appropriate, identifier: Galentine’s Day. Regardless of if you’ll be spending this year with a significant other, these literary female friendships will inspire you to be thankful for those devoted, trustworthy friends who always have your back. In literature, shared experiences—be it living under the same harsh conditions or experiencing love for the first time—form the foundation for female friendship. Whether the story takes place 200 years in the past or here in the 21st century, between mothers and daughters or college girlfriends, one thing remains true in…

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Early Bird Books: In Conversation with Alice Walker

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The author of “The Color Purple” reads three of her poems and answers reader questions about her work, life, and views on society. On February 9, 1944, Pulitzer Prize-winning author Alice Walker was born in Georgia. Walker lived under Jim Crow laws that were present during that time in the South. But her parents resisted such segregation, refusing to subject their children to working in the fields for white plantation owners. Growing up listening to stories her grandfather would tell, Walker began writing when she was just eight years old. She published her first poetry collection, Once, in 1968, and her debut novel The Third Life of Grange Copeland in 1970. In 1982, she published her award-winning novel The Color Purple. The iconic book…

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#ReadingBlackout: 28 Books by Black Women for Black History Month

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BookTrib is partnering with Bookish to bring you more great content. This February, in honor of Black History Month, readers are participating in #readingblackout, a movement started by BookTuber Denise D. Cooper that encourages readers to exclusively pick up books by black authors. The Bookish team couldn’t resist joining in, and since we can’t get enough of books written by talented women, we put together a recommendation list featuring 28 books (one for each day of February) written by black women. You’re sure to find a few familiar covers on this list, but we hope you also find some new reads for your TBR pile. We’d love to hear about the books you’re reading for #readingblackout. Tell us about them in the comments! We were so taken with Here…

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Early Bird Books: 13 Books Our Favorite Celebrities Love

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Stars—they read like us! We’ll be the first to admit that we love a bit of celebrity gossip—especially when it involves what’s on people’s shelves. Lately, stars like Reese Witherspoon and Emma Watson have been hopping on the book club train, selecting titles each month and leading thoughtful reading discussions with their fans. It’s been a great way to highlight the latest debut authors, or bring old, forgotten gems back into the limelight. We’re all about using fame to the benefit of a good book. Below, you’ll find recommendations that come straight from the mouths of our favorite celebrities. From childhood classics to later-in-life discoveries, these are the reads that have made lasting impressions on Academy Award winners, singers, and more. Tom Hanks Blood on…

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Who Says Size Matters?: Short Story Collections That Belong on Every Novel-Reader’s Shelf

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On the difference between short stories and novels, Stephen King described the former as “a kiss in the dark from a stranger.” His meaning? While they may lack the length of traditional novels, short stories certainly aren’t lacking in depth—just as a kiss carries its own special magic, without the commitment of a serious relationship. The collections below are testaments to the unique power of the short story. Individual snapshots of husbands and wives, sons and daughters, are connected by central themes—whether those be love, grief, hope, or loneliness. Together, they form a cohesive whole that portrays the ups and downs of the human experience, while packing the emotional punches you’d find in the best novels. A Model World, Michael…

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Early Bird Books: 10 of Our Favorite First Lines in Literature

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From Melville to Didion, these first sentences created lasting and notable impressions. Some of literature’s most iconic lines come to us within the first paragraphs of our favorite novels. They are the hooks onto which we latch, and the springboards that launch us further into the narrative. There’s a reason these words make up some of the most quotable lines in literature—readers simply can’t get them out of their heads. Take a look below to see some of our favorite opening lines. While first impressions can be tough, they won us over in just a single sentence. “You better not never tell nobody but God.”  The Color Purple By Alice Walker Set in the 1930s, The Color Purple details the…

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Early Bird Books: 8 Notable Books That Inspired Memorable Movies

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Books and movies have a relationship that’s as old as Hollywood itself. Together, writers and filmmakers have given us everything from great adaptations to huge disappointments, and some truly weird interpretations in between. But that comes with the territory of turning our favorite words into live action pieces of cinema. If you’re a fan of both books and movies, check out these eight books that inspired adaptations. The Color Purple, Alice Walker The Color Purple won the Pulitzer Prize in 1983 and went on to inspire the classic 1985 Steven Spielberg film of the same name. With apologies to Spielberg, Walker’s novel remains the definitive version of the story. Walker’s book uses a technique that film just can’t accommodate. The…

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Five Hidden Pearls of African-American Literature

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As an African-American writer, I have long been a student of black writers from many different genres who have influenced, inspired, challenged, enlightened, and entertained me. We’ve all heard of the obvious ones: the speeches of Frederick Douglass, the poetry of Langston Hughes and Gwendolyn Brooks, Ralph Ellison’s Invisible Man, Alice Walker’s The Color Purple, and Toni Morrison’s Beloved, just to name a few. But there’s a treasure trove of lesser-known works of African-American writing that have had a big impact on me and deserve to be read. Here’s my list of books that you might not know about. (I’ve chosen books in different categories in order to avoid having my special favorites competing in my head with every other…

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