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Algonquin Books

A Book Worth Savoring: Isabel Vincent’s Dinner with Edward

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Some books challenge you. Others feel like cozy sweaters. It’s rare to find a book that does both. And that’s exactly what Isabel Vincent’s latest memoir, Dinner with Edward: A Story of an Unexpected Friendship (Algonquin Books, May 24, 2016) manages to do, by striking the perfect balance between being bittersweet and making you so damn hungry. Vincent, an investigative journalist for the New York Post, tells the story of her friendship with the 93-year-old father of one of her best friends (who lived out of the country at the time). Edward’s wife of 69 years passes away, and he’s ready to give up on life; Vincent, still reeling from a crumbling marriage, agrees to check up on him once and a while. What begins as…

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All in the Family: 3 Books that Explore the Ties that Bind

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There’s no getting around it—as we build toward the holidays we’re going to have to spend at least some time with family. To put it all in perspective we have three books about families in emotional crisis. There’s nothing like peeking at someone else’s family drama to appreciate your own family. This week’s recommendations are brought to us by Jill Miner, owner of Saturn Booksellers, a popular independent bookstore that has won the Michigan Retailer of the Year Award for small businesses and the local Chamber of Commerce’s Golden Pineapple Award for Best Customer Service. The Muralist by B.A. Shapiro (Algonquin Books, November 3, 2015) “During Roosevelt’s WPA program, artists were put to work creating large-scale pieces for public spaces.…

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Everyday Heroes: 3 Novels about the Road to Redemption

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When facing life’s biggest challenges, even ordinary folk can become heroes. Events coordinator Sam Kaas of Village Books in Bellingham, Washington chose this week’s theme; “Three Tales of Messy Redemption and Defiant Perseverance.” He was influenced by the great Northwest writer Brian Doyle (Mink River, The Plover), who says that his books are about “ordinary, strange, flawed people who stare into the face of terrifying darkness, join hands, and march forward.” City On Fire by Garth Risk Hallberg (Knopf, October 13, 2015) “A massive, gritty, and ultimately triumphant novel, City On Fire follows an ensemble cast—artists, writers, journalists, cops, punks, kids—through six tumultuous months in New York City, from New Year’s Eve, 1976 to the devastating, city-wide blackout of July 13…

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Heat Index: 5 Hot New Books that Depict Heroines’ Survival Stories

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This week’s Heat Index honors the women in fiction who will stop at nothing to live a happy and fulfilled life, regardless of who tried to knock them down or what circumstances led to the difficult situations they found themselves in each day. They’re stories about love, friendship and family and the journey to self-discovery that proves it’s not always about what you don’t have, but what you make of what you do have that matters most. The Mistake I Made, Paula Daly (Grove Press, September 15) “[Daly] writes with a singular voice and a fierce passion that roars off the page, while also displaying a visceral understanding of the betrayals and humiliations of domestic life.” —Daily Mail Heat Index: Roz…

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Heat Index: 5 Hot New Book Covers We Can’t Stop Looking At

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One of the most alluring factors for me when picking my next read is the cover. I’m a sucker for a stop-you-in-your-tracks book cover. Gorgeous covers inspire an immediate top spot on your TBR list before you’ve even read the inside flap to find out what the story is about. So for this week’s Heat Index, I’m compiling five of my recent favorites and let me tell you, narrowing it down to five was a tough job. Not only were these five reads a delight to look at, but they earned mega bonus points for having a fantastic story living between the covers. The Girl at Midnight, Melissa Grey (Delacorte Press, April 2015) “A feisty heroine, fun supporting characters, a mission…

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