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Alafair Burke

Bookish: Writers Recommend: What Attica Locke, Danielle Lazarin, and Laurie Gwen Shapiro Are Reading Now

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BookTrib is partnering with Bookish to bring you more great content. In order to be a good author, you’ve got to be a good reader, right? That’s what we’ve always thought anyway. To keep our shelves stocked with must-read recommendations, we scoured social media to discover the books that our favorite writers recommend. Looking for more recommendations? Check out our staff reads. Anna Meriano loved Stella Díaz Has Something to Say and so did we. Finally picked this up and I’m already in loveeeee 😍😍😍 pic.twitter.com/JQ8peNxGv7 — Anna Meriano (@AnnaMisboring) February 14, 2018 Attica Locke shared an emoji review of The Wife by Alafair Burke. Just finished. 🤭😳👏🏾❤️ A post shared by attica (@atticalocke) on Feb 1, 2018 at 8:48pm PST Danielle Lazarin is itching to read Rachel Lyon’s Self-Portrait with Boy. I can’t wait till launch…

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Suspense, Romance, Cooking and More: The Best New Releases of the Week

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January is coming to a end, but that only means the new releases are picking up. To keep you company for the rest of the month, we have a list of the very best new releases from this week. Danielle Steel’s new book is out, and for all of us who may swear just a bit too much, Emma Byrne reveals the science of why it may actually be good for you! From the latest literary fiction and the best new cookbooks, to the best romance and suspense, here is the list of new releases from this week: 12 Rules For Life: An Antidote to Chaos, Jordan B. Peterson Fall from Grace, Danielle Steel Swearing is Good for You: The Amazing Science of Bad…

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*New Releases*: New York Magazine Turns 50, Joan Didion Gets a Second Look and ‘Girl Logic’ Rules!

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In addition to a host of political books released on election day,  we’re celebrating the release of a new book on the 50th anniversary of the New York Magazine with one of the most culturally-relevant coffee tables books, as well as comedian Iliza Shlesinger’s first book, Girl Logic (watch out for giveaways starting this Thursday!). Of course, we would be remiss to not mention the re-publication of Joan Didion’s non-fiction essays, a stunning collection full of everything we love about her writing. From non-fiction essays, some classic suspense novels, a famous vlogger taking on mental health with brutal honesty, and comedians taking on “a man’s world” with intelligence, grace, and hilarity, here are eight of the best new releases for the week. Highbrow, Lowbrow,…

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The 25 Beach Bag Books You Should be Reading — WIN a Bag FULL of Books!

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There’s nothing quite like being at the beach. Picture it, you’re lying in the warm sun, listening to the waves crash in front of you as the beautiful breeze keeps you cool; it’s pretty much every person’s dream day. The only thing that can make it even better is having the perfect beach read to really help you kick back and relax. Well, get ready because we’ve got the perfect list for all of those gorgeous summer beach days coming up. Here are 25 of the perfect books (in no particular order) that you definitely NEED to have in your beach bag. WIN 12 of the 25 amazing books below and a BookTrib Tote Bag!  Click the bag to ENTER: The Girls In The Garden…

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I’ll have a peanut butter and pickle sandwich, please!

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From a cyanide-laced cocktail to a soothing cup of teeth and a biscuit (the British kind, of course) after a long day at the office, food, drink, and crime fiction are intertwined. Miss Marple, one of the genre’s most recognizable heroines, is estimated to have consumed a whopping 143 cups of tea over the course of 12 Agatha Christie novels and 20 short stories. This is just one of the delicious factoids you can learn in The Mystery Writers of America Cookbook, edited by Kate White, and featuring a selection of dishes—and drinks—from some of the biggest names in the mystery world. And if that doesn’t quell your appetite, be sure to check out Cooking with Crimespree, edited by Jon…

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SUMMER READS 2014: Chilling mysteries to beat the summer heat

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It’s hot. You’re sweaty, even sitting next to the pool or on a blanket on a nice beach somewhere. Luckily, your bag—and if you’re like so many of us at BookTrib, your reading material outweighs everything else—is full of opportunities to escape the oppressive temperatures with some good, old-fashioned suspense, the kind that makes cold sweat run down the back of your neck. These six thrilling summer reads will be like ice cubes to your nerves. Just remember, BookTrib is not responsible for any sleepless nights. Suspicion by Joseph Finder (Dutton, May 27) The moral of Finder’s adrenaline-fueled ride is simple: don’t accept money from strangers. Especially large sums of money from very powerful, and very shady, men. Single dad…

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To Harriet, on her 50th birthday: contemporary writers reflect on the influence of HARRIET THE SPY

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In the beginning, there were stories. Always stories. And with stories come writers. So begins Louise Fitzhugh’s 1964 classic, Harriet the Spy:    Harriet was trying to explain to Sport how to play Town. “See, first you make up the name of the town. Then you write down the names of all the people who live in it. You can’t have too many or it gets too hard. I usually have twenty-five.”    “Ummmmm.” Sport was tossing a football in the air. They were in the courtyard of Harriet’s house on East Eighty-seventh Street in Manhattan.    “Then when you know who lives there, you make up what they do. For instance, Mr. Charles Hanley runs the filling station on…

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