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Agatha Christie

Love Mysteries? Love Books? Here’s a Collection For You

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If you like mysteries and you like books, there’s a collection of stories you should know about. Bibliomysteries: Volume Two, edited by Otto Penzler and to be published in August by Pegasus, is just what the title implies: a collection of crime stories about rare books, bookshops, libraries, manuscripts, magical books, collectors, and the like. Among the 15 stories, Ian Rankin sets his tale of the lost manuscript of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde in the legendary Paris bookshop Shakespeare & Co., while F. Paul Wilson offers a book with remarkable powers; Joyce Carol Oates portrays an overly ambitious dealer in mystery fiction; James Grady has the “Condor” working in the Library of Congress; Stephen Hunter tells a previously unknown story of Alan…

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2017’s Best: Our Favorite Books Turned into Major Motion Pictures

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Every year, we patiently await the arrival of film adaptations derived from some of our favorite novels and every year Hollywood does not disappoint! This year, our favorites include a piece of little known history, scary clowns, steamy romance, and a murder mystery classic.  If they aren’t on your must-read list already, mark them down for 2018!   January 2017: Hidden Figures, Margot Lee Shetterly Of course we have to jumpstart this list with our pick for January, the New York Times Bestseller, Hidden Figures, which tells the true story of the black female mathematicians that changed the way we see NASA today. Without their achievements in the calculations they made every day, we wouldn’t see some of the greatest breakthroughs we’ve…

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9 Books for Fans of ‘Murder on the Orient Express’

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The latest adaptation of Agatha Christie’s Murder on the Orient Express has finally hit theaters. Actor Kenneth Branagh stars as the iconic French sleuth Hercule Poirot, whose train journey is derailed by the murder of a notorious passenger. As one might expect from an adaptation of the Queen of Crime’s works, there are as many red herrings as there are potential suspects, and such close quarters creates a palpable sense of menace. Once violence breaks out on board, there’s nowhere to run—forcing predator and prey to sit side by side. The release has gotten us thinking about our other favorite mysteries—especially those set on trains. From a Patricia Highsmith classic to Poirot’s very first investigation, these books are perfect reads…

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The everlasting detective: When gumshoes return from the grave

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We take fictional deaths hard. From classic literature (we’re still coming to terms with Lennie’s death in Of Mice and Men and Jay Gatsby’s demise in Fitzgerald’s masterpiece) to modern bestsellers (we won’t spoil it for anyone, but X’s death in Mockingjay and Y’s death in Allegiant shook us up), readers mourn for figments of an author’s imagination. But sometimes dying isn’t the last page of the story. Some heroes are resurrected—to readers’ mixed reception. In several instances, it’s the choice of the author to bring a seemingly dead character back to life (Sherlock Holmes and “The Reichenbach Fall,” anyone?). Other times, the resurrection comes long after the original author’s death. Putting aside the larger issue of whether the dead…

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Ten most memorable lines from literature by female authors

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In this second installment of BookTrib’s continuing series that aims to bring you, dear reader, 50 of the most memorable lines in literature, you’ll have lots of fodder for those late-night trivia sessions at the bar. Or just some pithy responses to everyday questions. How do you work classic literature into your daily life? And, as always, we welcome your suggestions in the comments. Books and the literary lifestyle thrive when shared. As an added bonus, since 2014 is the Year of Reading Women, this week’s installment offers ten brilliant gems from women writers.   1. To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee Advice as easily applicable as to writing as it is to how we live our lives, Atticus…

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