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BookTrib Guest Author has 129 articles published.

is a published author or professional writer who we are thrilled to present to our readers. These unique contributors provide readers with a fascinating look at the world from an author’s perspective.

Discovering Your Story’s Monomyth and Transforming a Character’s Journey

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Every time I see an award show, I’m reminded about how much people love “the myth.” That’s the allegory; the handed down story that always affects people’s heart strings. The two myths that guarantee awards appear to be: first the story of Lazarus, where the hero rises from the dead — a perfect arc! You know the one where a man falls, crumbles, and then rises like a phoenix to success? And second, anything to do with World War II and heroes that save the fallen. Stories such as Shindler’s List, Casablanca, Sergeant York, Hail the Conquering Hero, One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest, Lion, The Girl on the Train, The Goldfinch, are all stories of lost souls who fall, are broken,…

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How Life Led Robin Finn to Write Her First Novel and Discover a Village of Support

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Author and essayist Robin Finn is an advocate for children with ADHD/2e. Over time, Finn has discovered that she’s not the only one going through the challenges she’s faced as a parent raising a child with ADHD. Here Robin Finn talks about her journey, her writing process and how she found an outlet through writing. My author journey started when I began writing personal essays about parenting a child with special challenges. To my surprise, when these essays appeared in The Washington Post, Huffington Post, BuzzFeed, and other outlets, readers responded. My inbox was flooded with emails from parents having a similar experience. One of the most challenging aspects of writing about raising a child with ADHD was not letting it…

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S.H.I.N.E. in 2017 and Leave All of the Excuses Behind

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Welcome to 2017! You made it. Let the happy dancing commence. Your vision board is made and prominently placed to be seen daily. You’ve made your New Year’s resolutions and are full of confidence that you will accomplish them all. You vow to be your best self yet. Better health. Advance in your career. Save more money. All doable but what is your exact game plan? I suggest you S.H.I.N.E.! I wrote an Amazon bestselling book, S.H.I.N.E. and WIN: 5 Keys to Conquer the Fear of Failure. In it, I reference the S.H.I.N.E. and WIN blueprint I created to demystify the 5 keys to get you from where you are today, to where you want to be tomorrow. S.H.I.N.E. is…

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Myth and the Modern Woman: Why We Need Fairy Tales to Survive

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“I too am not a bit tamed…I too, am untranslatable/I sound my barbaric yawp over the roof of the worlds” – Walt Whitman When I was a child, I wouldn’t only read stories, I would become them. I would wear ball gowns of every color and insist that you call me Cinderella, Belle, or Snow White for weeks on end. It was not until I was twelve when I read The Power of Myth that I understood what had been happening to me.  Joseph Campbell dedicated his life to tell us that myths and stories are essential to our survival: “Myths are clues to the spiritual potentialities of the human life…Myth helps you to put your mind in touch with…

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Does the History of Jack the Ripper Lead Us to Discovering He was Really Jane the Ripper?

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Several years ago, I stumbled on the theory that Jack the Ripper could have been a woman. As history goes, Inspector Frederick Abberline briefly considered a midwife as the killer. There’s no evidence Abberline seriously pursued this theory, and most Ripperologists dismiss the idea since little to no trace or forensic evidence pointed to a woman as the killer. But the seed was planted, growing like a stubborn dandelion in an otherwise perfectly manicured lawn. In 1939, William Stewart published Jack the Ripper: A New Theory. Stewart focused on four key questions: What sort of person could move about late at night without raising suspicion in their own household or on the streets? Who could walk the streets in blood…

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DATELINE Nov. 23, 1907 – The Carlisle Indians Play a Final Game That Changed the Rules

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In the last game of the season, the Carlisle Indians (9-1) took on the Big Ten champs, the heavily favored University of Chicago. Worse, the Indians had lost their star quarterback, Frank Mt. Pleasant, to a broken thumb. Over 27,000 Chicago fans (below) were eager for a “massacre at Marshall Field.” Chicago’s coach, Amos Alonzo Stagg, was Pop Warner’s rival in trick plays and experimenting with the new passing game. To shut down the Indians’ air attack, Stagg had a new trick: the first “pass defense.” It was simple. When the ball’s snapped, knock down the Indians go-to receivers, Exendine and Gardner. If they get up and run, knock ‘em down again. It was all legal. During the game, it worked…

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How Collective Readership Takes Us Deeper

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I’ve had a long history of questioning my true love for books ever since I had trouble enjoying the novels I was assigned in grade school. In fact, if I look at The Odyssey one more time, I’ll probably lose my mind. As someone who claimed to love books so much, I had to ask myself: ‘Why did I have such difficulty enjoying academically recommended books? Shouldn’t they appeal to the average bibliophile?’ It took me two years worth of college English classes to find my answer. This past semester, I took a class that felt like a weekly book club, except with college credit. Not only was I assigned to read books that have made it to my list…

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DATELINE November 16, 1907 — “Masters of the New Football”

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Not only “masters,” the Carlisle Indians are moneymakers. When it comes to box-office draw, they’re No. 1 in the nation, taking in $45,000 at the gate in 1907 (President Roosevelt’s salary is $50,000.) Why such a draw? Every “footballist” in America wants to see how a crew of ingenious Indians from the little Carlisle Indian School are making big time changes to how football is played. When Carlisle traveled to the Midwest (the “Wild West of Football”) and took on the University of Minnesota, more than 8,000 fans crammed into Northrop Field (above; look above the left goal post – two guys on a power pole!). The game was a perfect matchup: old-school football vs. new-school football. Minnesota’s two scores…

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DATELINE Nov. 9, 1907 — The Carlisle Indians Finally Have Their Day at Harvard

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Eleven times, the Carlisle Indians have traveled to Boston to take on the Harvard Crimson. Eleven times, they have gone home defeated. Before the game, here’s what Coach Pop Warner told the Indians: Boys, today you face the sons and grandsons of the men who conquered your people. They are the descendants of the white men who ordered the ruination of your tribes. And now, the sons and grandsons of your conquerors want their turn to fight the tribe that has risen against them: the Carlisle Indians. But this time, unlike the wars of the past, the contest between red men and white will be waged on equal terms. This time, the playing field is level and you’re going to…

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DATELINE 1907 — The Carlisle Indians are First in Firsts

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  First all-Indian football team (1894) First non-college team to play against and beat the Ivy Leagues First to travel cross-country for a game (U. of California, 1899) First to launch the passing game and game-changing “single wing” (1907) First to send scouts to spy on other teams in prep for games First to call audibles, using Indian words unknown to opponents First to use the fake punt, reverse, and screen pass On Nov. 2, 1907, they bagged another “first” when they took on the Princeton Tigers at the New York Polo Grounds, home of baseball and football. Despite torrential rain, 30,000 football fanatics crowded into the Polo Grounds to see Carlisle’s dazzling new style of play. They witnessed the…

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Iowa and Edna Ferber: The Origins Of ‘The Northeast Quarter’

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In my debut novel, The Northeast Quarter (Wheatmark, November 15, 2016) I tell the story of Ann Hardy, 10 years old at the beginning of the book, who overcomes 12 years of betrayal, banishment, even physical violence, to mature into a smart young female lawyer, who struggles to retain rights to her family’s richest piece of land, “The Northeast Quarter.” The story is loosely based on gossip I heard as a child between his mother and her cousins about family property in rural Iowa. When I began The Northeast Quarter, my goal at the time was to write a play which resembled an Edna Ferber-type novel and set it in Iowa. I had always liked Ferber’s novels for their sweep…

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You Can’t Reboot a Book: The Beauty in Reading to Your Children

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It’s interactive, it will transport you from one time and world into the next, but most importantly, it builds lasting relationships. Today, getting children to focus is a challenge—there’s media everywhere. Lights, sounds, internet games; that’s enough to distract anybody, let alone a child who’s in the developing stages of life. We all know that children are sponges, but what is it that they are absorbing? Be it a cell phone, gaming console, or computer, the synergy is between the child and the machine. What is it that they are learning? Is this machine an extension of them? There are plenty of scifi novels and movies that tell us where that might get us. When you read a book to…

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Smithsonian Libraries: Bestselling Author Katherine Neville Talks Hidden Wonders and Adopt-a-Book Program

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Six years ago, I became the first author ever appointed to serve on the Advisory Board of the Smithsonian Libraries, in Washington, D.C. Even though I recognized what a great honor it was to be invited onto the board of this prestigious and unique institution, I never realized how wonderful it would be for me, personally, to be plunged into this world of fascinating rare books. Like most authors who write bestsellers with historic plots, I love real history coming alive before my eyes: our Smithsonian Libraries comprise the most important museum library system anywhere in the history of the world, chock full of amazing books and documents that we can actually hold in our hands, share with others —…

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Engaging Millennials: Getting America’s Fastest-Growing Workforce Invested, Retained and Performing to Their Full Potential

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You know who they are. Those unengaged employees who simply show up, do their jobs and then go home, not giving their work a second thought. However, also fairly obvious are fully engaged employees—those who are clearly passionate about what they do, why they do it and, particularly notably, the impact their work is having on the world around them. Unfortunately, high employee engagement among Millennials—the largest workforce in the U.S.—is proving to be the exception and not the norm. A recent Gallup poll of more than one million participants revealed that less than one-third of Millennials—only 29 percent—are engaged in their jobs. The data also underscores the critical difference employee engagement makes, considering that business units in the top…

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DATELINE 1907 – Football Formation or the Top View of a Birthday Cake?

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Both! On Oct. 26, 1907, the “single wing” offense was unleashed on UPenn by Pop Warner and the Carlisle Indians. With the center able to snap the ball to three backs (TB, FB, QB), the options of run, handoff or pass were endless. The birth of the single wing (now called the “wildcat”) transformed football from a move-the-pile brawl, to the fast, open game we watch today. On that fateful day in 1907, what did the single wing do to No. 4 ranked UPenn? Two stats tell it. Carlisle had 402 yards to Penn’s 76, and 22 first downs to Penn’s 3. The Philadelphia Press told it this way: “With racial savagery and ferocity the Carlisle Indian eleven grabbed Penn’s…

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Weight Loss Success 101: Author and Health Advocate Merilee Kern Gets You Through the Holidays!

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As health-seekers strategize their diet and fitness approach for the holiday gluttony season and those inevitable New Year’s resolutions just beyond, there are a few simple but key considerations that can make all the difference between a successful—and even profitable—weight-loss endeavor and a wellness endeavor that falls far short. In seeking expert advice I connected with diet and fitness industry insider Jimmy Fleming, co-founder of HealthyWage—a company that offers industry-leading corporate and team-based weight loss challenges and financially-induced diet contests for individuals. He offered some compelling insights and opinions on critical elements needed for the best chance of success with a weight-loss initiative. Here are Fleming’s top five ideas: 1. Map out specific goals & timeframes You are far more…

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