Literary Fiction, Biography

Author and lifelong birder

John survived a demanding childhood in Yorkshire, England, and went on to become a very successful Human Resources executive. At the age of 35 he was relocated to the United States by his employer (Bank of America) and subsequently became a U.S. citizen. He worked for Stanford University and the University of California before retiring. He lost his wife to cancer and has since developed a relationship with Nancy (Hilda in his novel Abandoned in Berlin).

His love of history, knowledge of Human Resources and lifelong hobby of bird-watching guide his storytelling. He desires to write creatively and use what happened to him in the past to influence his manuscripts (especially An Unplanned Encounter and the soon-to-be published She Wore a Yellow Dress). He owes his success to the women in his life — Abandoned in Berlin acknowledges women of determination who survived the Holocaust and fought the Germans after the World War II in the Law Courts. 

John attended Nunthorpe Grammar School in York, England and graduated from the University of Hull. Today he lives in Marin County, CA, and has two grown children and four grandchildren.

BOOKS:

An Unplanned Encounter (2014) — under the pseudonym Johnathan Husband

Abandoned in Berlin (2018)

Your biggest literary influences:

Ian McEwan and Erik Larson.

Last book read:

Balcony Over Jerusalem by John Lyons.

The book that changed your life:

Education changed my life, not any single book.

Currently working on:

She Wore a Yellow Dress.

Words to live by:

Honesty, trust, collaboration, continuing education, helping others and respect.

Advice for aspiring authors:

Persevere and love what you do.

Testimonials:

“The Nazi persecution of the Jews — stripping them of their rights, property and lives — continues to haunt subsequent generations. Abandoned in Berlin illustrates how the Third Reich’s legal system was used to expropriate one Jewish family’s apartment block, and how the family’s burning sense of injustice lives on to this day.”
— Dina Gold, author of Stolen Legacy: Nazi Theft and the Quest for Justice at Krausenstrasse 17/18.

“Could not put it down. Perhaps the German court system will give a second thought to its past failure to provide justice for Nazi treatment of Jews in the 1930’s, and more disturbing in the 1950’s, and possibly continuing now. Perhaps this well-written book will open some eyes and some justice might still be obtained? Anyone familiar with anyone in power in the German court system today should buy this book and send it to him or her. There has to be a better outcome than this book has pictured so lucidly.”
— Amazon Reviewer

“A true story that was well written. What captured me was the jurisprudence in Hitler’s Germany. Hilda goes back to Germany as an adult to learn more about the history of her family. What she learns is shocking in relationship to antisemitism and the court system in Germany. It is a subject many people know nothing about, but should learn about. Who said history repeats itself?”
— goodreads Reviewer