Tag archive

Wuthering Heights

Last Minute Literary Vacation Ideas from Five Classic Novels

in Fiction by

The summer’s drawing to a close, and you still have one thing left to do: Vacation! There are so many places you could go, from Barcelona to Disney World! But you, being a huge literary nerd since birth, might want to go to a place with a story – literally! We know there are plenty more amazing places with literary history, but here are five that will transform these last days of summer into classics. The Hamptons – The Great Gatsby, F. Scott Fitzgerald (CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform, February 1, 2017): Sadly, East Egg and West Egg don’t exist, so we’ll have to settle for the Hamptons. *Sigh* Sure, you probably won’t see parties as extravagant and crazy as Gatsby’s,…

Keep Reading

Summer Reading Redemption: English Class Reads that Deserve Second Chances

in Fiction by

High school sucked, right? Totally. Anyway, remember all those books you had to read? Turns out some of them were pretty good! Overcome your pimply PTSD and revisit some classics you may have overlooked back in the day. Matt’s Take Hey, who remembers high school? Because I sure don’t. My terrible bouts of awkwardness and raging hormones made sure I blocked out the majority of those four years. But some memories just stick, like assigned readings, and getting rejected by cheerleading captain Joanna Michaels*. Damn, she was ice cold. If you were at all like me in high school, there were some books you enjoyed and some you flat-out hated. We enjoy doing things on our own time, not when…

Keep Reading

Five authors whose fame rests on a single great novel

in Fiction by

“When he was nearly thirteen, my brother Jem got his arm badly broken at the elbow.” And so begins Harper Lee’s seminal 1960 novel, To Kill a Mockingbird, where we’re introduced to young Jean Louise “Scout” Finch, her brother and protector, Jem, and their father, the wise attorney and champion for justice Atticus Finch. Equal parts coming-of-age tale, Southern Gothic, and social commentary, Mockingbird—this is the pre-Katniss Everdeen version featuring the bird—is one of the most beloved novels of the 20th century. In 2006, in a poll conducted in Britain, librarians ranked it as the book every adult should read (it came in ahead of the Bible). The themes—racial inequality, rape, loss of innocence—are as resonant today as they were…

Keep Reading

Need a date (or want to stay single)? Open a book.

in Fiction by

Literature is rife with romantic prospects, as well as those people your mother would tell you to avoid at all costs. When you’re sitting at home, staring at your bookshelf this Valentine’s Day, consider these fictional characters who would arguably make a better (or infinitely worse) date than that one you’re either preparing (or wishing) for. There’s someone here for everyone. Let’s start with the ones in the plus column.     Mr. Fitzwilliam Darcy (Jane Austen’s Pride and Prejudice): Everyone’s (or at least most people’s) favorite eligible Austen man, Mr. Darcy is the one you want if you’re into hate-at-first-sight that eventually blossoms into love.         Count Dracula (Bram Stoker’s Dracula): A less obvious choice, but…

Keep Reading

Go to Top