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Holly Brown’s Strong Female Overcomes Toxic Workplace

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Holly Brown’s ‘How Far She’s Come’  tells the timely story of Cheyenne, a woman with a history of sexual harassment chasing her dream to work at the Independent News Network. To her delight, she is able to secure a job broadcasting for the network. However, to her horror, the modern professional veneer of the network starts to quickly disappear as she is once again subjugated to harassment from her peers. Even more unsettling, a diary is left as a warning for Cheyenne by a previous female broadcaster. As it becomes apparent that Cheyenne is being manipulated into events similar to those in the diary, she must change the power dynamics in a toxic workplace to show everyone she will not…

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Jeffrey Pfeffer on Leadership: Fixing Workplaces and Careers One Truth at a Time

in Non-Fiction by

In a world full of books, webinars, sensitivity training, TED Talks and employee retreats, you’d think that by now, we’d have gotten the hang of leadership. Not so, says bestselling author and noted Stanford business school management expert Jeffrey Pfeffer. Surveys from far and wide tell us that leadership is failing at an alarming rate. Employee distrust of their leaders is widespread. Leader tenure is decreasing as more and more talented individuals suffer from career burn-out. Data indicates that about 50 percent of leaders are failing their employees, their organizations or themselves in one way or another. How can this happen when so many self-proclaimed leadership experts are so willing to sell us the solution to the problem? The first…

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The Extraordinary Power of Treating Your Employees Well

in Non-Fiction by

I don’t know when it happened, but at some point, “the bottom line” took over American business. It became the all-important end-all and be-all of existence. It became the god that American companies worshiped above everything else. It wasn’t always like that. At one time, people mattered. Companies invested themselves in their employees, financially and emotionally. It was important for companies to have “lifers,” people who saw the company as “family,” as a place that nurtured and provided for them. Do you remember those times? At some point, though, that changed. Management tactics shifted. At one such company, writes author and CEO Bob Chapman, problems were met with “frequent restructurings and layoffs [that] succeeded only in exacerbating its problems, damaging…

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Germanwings crash draws attention to depression, stress in workplace

in Non-Fiction by

As awful as the news was about the recent crash in the French Alps of Germanwings Flight 9525, the world was shocked once again when it was learned that the disaster, which cost 150 people their lives, seems to have been caused intentionally by the flight’s co-pilot, Andres Lubitz. In the aftermath of the crash, it was learned that Lubitz had been treated for severe depression and suicidal tendencies prior to his training as a commercial pilot. There are few occupations more stressful than that of the commercial airline pilot (in fact, the employment industry webzine CareerCast.com recently rated it 2015’s fourth most-stressful job, behind those of firefighters, enlisted military personnel and military generals). All jobs come with their own…

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