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Winston Churchill

Ike and Kay a World War II Passionate Love Affair

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There are some stories we hear and dismiss as just rumor… and then there are others that are too good to ignore. This is exactly what led critically acclaimed historical fiction author James MacManus to discover the incredible story of the love affair between Dwight Eisenhower and Kay Summersby, his wartime aide and driver. Ike and Kay (Overlook Press) sees a love story between two people amid the carnage and the horrors of the Second World War in Europe and North Africa. The affair between Eisenhower and Summersby was fragile but passionate, made stronger by the support she offered to him throughout the difficulties of war.  Though Eisenhower returned to his wife, there’s no doubting they were genuinely in love.…

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Just the Right Book Podcast: A Book Lovers Guide to the 2018 Oscars!

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Jimmy Kimmel will be hosting The Oscars again this year and we are thrilled to see so many book-based movies nominated! Also, stay tuned for a sneak peek of our conversation with author A.J. Jacobs talking about “It’s All Relative: Adventures Up and Down the World’s Family Tree” which will be out later this week. The 90th Oscars telecast on Sunday, March 4, 2018, will now begin at 8:00 p.m. EST/5:00 p.m. PST The Books Adapted Into This Year’s Oscar Contenders: Call Me by Your Name, adapted from André Aciman’s novel of the same name: best picture; actor in a leading role (Timothée Chalamet); original song; and adapted screenplay (James Ivory). Darkest Hour, based on the book Darkest Hour: How Churchill Brought England Back from the Brink by Anthony…

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The forgotten hero who helped save England in World War II

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Harry Hopkins entered my life in my final year at St. Andrews University in Scotland when my tutor, who was from Texas, wanted me to assess the reputation of a man who had fallen “through a trapdoor in history.” I had never heard of Harry Hopkins before and nor, as my tutor remarked sadly, had anyone else in the United Kingdom. Yet, he told me that Britain’s wartime survival in the face of the Nazi onslaught owed a great deal to a man whom Winston Churchill had called “ a lighthouse from which there shone the beams that led great fleets to harbour.” The memory of that conversation has stayed with me. Forty-five years later, I hope I have thrown…

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Video: Missed It? Live Interview with James MacManus, Author of Sleep in Peace Tonight

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ABOUT SLEEP IN PEACE TONIGHT It’s January 1941, and the Blitz is devastating England. Food supplies are low, Tube stations in London have become bomb shelters, and U-boats have hampered any hope of easy victory. Though the United States maintains its isolationist position, Churchill knows that England is finished without the aid of its powerful ally. Harry Hopkins, President Roosevelt’s most trusted adviser, is sent to London as his emissary, and there he falls under the spell of Churchill’s commanding rhetoric—and legendary drinking habits. As he experiences life in a country under attack, Hopkins questions the United States’ silence in the war. But back home FDR is paranoid about the isolationist lobby, and even Hopkins is having trouble convincing him…

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From waif to monarch, JUMBO was symbolic of Victorian life

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 Born in 1861 in French Sudan, imported to Paris as a two year old calf, then later sold to the London Zoo at Regent’s Park, Jumbo the elephant delighted countless children (including Winston Churchill and Theodore Roosevelt) with rides and treats gently taken from outstretched hands. Each night, after the children and their families had gone home, he was mistreated in an attempt to keep him docile. By the time he reached sexual maturity, the abused and isolated animal had become dangerously unstable. He was sold to showman P.T. Barnum in 1881 (despite letters from 100,000 British schoolchildren who wrote to Queen Victoria begging her to prevent the sale) and brought to America. There, in the company of other elephants…

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