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Vintage Books

How ‘A Horse Walks Into a Bar’ Sheds Light on Advocacy

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A Horse Walks Into a Bar, the 2017 Man Booker International Prize Winner, is a stunning account of a middle aged, washed up comedian’s stand up show, but there is so much more. Taking place in the Israeli city of Netanya, Dovaleh Greenstein has invited a high school friend from military camp, Avishai Lavar, to watch the performance and then let him know what he sees…the person he really sees. In the audience, in addition to Lavar, now a retired judge, there is an unusual woman from Dov’s old neighborhood in attendance; a little person who endured bullying all her life, and throughout the show interjects comments and contributes her recollections from childhood. This book takes a hard look at…

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Murder, He Wrote: The Night Of-Inspired Summer Reading

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Based solely on the first episode, the new HBO limited series, The Night Of, seems to be equal parts True Detective and NPR’s Serial in the best ways possible. The story follows a young man, Nasir Khan (who goes by Naz) who gets swept into a horrible crime after a night of misguided frivolity with a mysterious, beautiful woman. Naz, a college student, picks her up in his father’s cab on his way to the popular kids’ college party, and has a dreamlike night of sex, drugs and odd drunken knife games before waking up to a nightmare: the woman’s body has been stabbed to death in bed next to him. Naz, who clearly doesn’t watch a lot of Law & Order, flees…

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Weddiquette: These 4 Books Will Get You Through the Never-Ending Wedding Season!

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The summer wedding season is upon us, which means your mailbox is overloaded with shower, bachelorette and wedding invitations. Lucky you, you’ve received yet another golden, silk envelope with a monogram to celebrate the next chapter of your best friend’s life. Sure, you’re filled with excitement and just like every other time, you immediately start planning your outfit, the bachelorette party, and of course, finding the perfect date. Unfortunately, sometimes there’s so much involved in the planning that you don’t get to just sit back and enjoy the wedding prep. Don’t worry though, you’re not alone. Just try to remember that friend of yours last summer who went to eight weddings in one season; if she could do it then you can…

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Visual Thinking: Temple Grandin’s TED Talk and a Book List to Give You Perspective

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April is National Autism Awareness Month, and it’s worth it to take a minute to celebrate the innumerable ways people are unique. Animal behavior pioneer Temple Grandin has been an Autism advocate and activist for years, and in her talk from TED2010, she shares her distinctive outlook on the world. She breaks down the main ways people on the “continuum” of Autism can develop as thinkers, and expands on her own experience as a visual thinker. For Grandin, her visual thinking allowed her insights into detail-oriented problem solving that the people around her missed – and in this talk, she makes it clear that young people today on the Autism spectrum have just as much potential as she did. In…

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International Women’s Day: Highlighting Six of Our Favorite Female Authors

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March 8 is International Women’s Day, which means we’re celebrating all those women from around the globe who inspire and entertain us. It’s easy to keep yourself in an Americanized bubble, only reading stories from the familiar authors we know and love. But the international book community is vast and vibrant, filled with writers from all different cultures and nationalities. In honor of all the talented women across the world, here are six international female authors (and their most recent books!) that you should be reading immediately: Lone Star, Paullina Simons (William Morrow, November 2015) I fell hard for Simons’ Bronze Horseman series, about an epic romance that starts in communist Russia during World War II and spans decades and continents. Since…

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Elvis Costello Shares the Books That are Most Important to Him

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Famous singer/songwriter Elvis Costello has a way with words. His songs are often darkly funny and filled with stories. Not only is he a magician with words when it comes to songwriting, but Costello recently added author to his list of achievements, proving once again just how much of a wordsmith he truly is. Unsurprisingly, he’s also a reader at heart and told New York Public Library some of his favorite literary cautionary tales. The Pat Hobby Stories, F. Scott Fitzgerald (Benediction Classics, 2011) Adolf Hitler: My Part In His Downfall, Spike Milligan (Viking Books, 2012) My Last Sigh, Luis Buñuel (Vintage Books, 2013) For the full post on Costello’s favorite books, visit NYPL.org.  

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Leonardo DiCaprio: From The Basketball Diaries to Serial Killer

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Like a lot of people, my introduction to the seemingly innate brilliance of Leonardo DiCaprio was in the 1995 classic The Basketball Diaries. At that point, DiCaprio was nearing two decades on this planet when he gave what is widely accepted as one of the most beautiful performances by a young actor in the history of American Cinema. The long, storied list of roles that illustrate DiCaprio’s creative prowess would take at least 20 articles to gather. So in the interest of time — and my fingers — let’s just say DiCaprio is his generation’s Marlon Brando. But something Leo — we’re on a first name basis — has only recently dove headlong into is the world of villainy. Calvin Candie…

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