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Stories about Man’s Best Friend Guaranteed to Warm the Heart

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There are two things that everyone here at BookTrib universally loves: books and dogs. We’re definitely a dog-friendly office, with our favorite little chihuahua, Lucy, popping by regularly. So when our two loves come together in the form of books about dogs, consider us happy campers. Seriously though, there’s just something about dog stories that always tug at our heartstrings. Picture that final moment in Homeward Bound where the pets come galloping up over the hill, and just try not to cry. It’s actually impossible. Here are five dog stories from 2016 that are guaranteed to warm your heart: Say Goodbye for Now, Catherine Ryan Hyde (Lake Union Publishing, December 13, 2016) Set in 1959, this novel tells the story of…

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Movie ‘New Life’ Brings on the Tears — and So Do These 5 Novels

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New Life The Movie

Sometimes I want to read joyful books or uplifting ones or tales of true love and happy endings. But other times I just want to bawl my eyes out, soaking the pages with my tears and reveling in the way the story makes my heart ache. It sounds strange, but it’s true: there’s something undeniably cathartic about giving yourself over to a true tearjerker. Which is why I can’t wait for the release of New Life, a new film releasing in theaters on October 28. Watch the trailer and you’ll see what I mean:   Not only does is James Marsters in it (Hellllooo, Spike!), it looks like one of those movies that’s bound to completely rip you apart emotionally; in…

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Jonesin’ For a Fix: Books for TV Addicts — Poldark Edition

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I have a problem. I’m obsessed with sexy historical shows and I just can’t quit. It started with Outlander, ramped up through Vikings, and crested along with Black Sails. It shows no signs of stopping, and honestly? I kind of don’t want it to. Especially when I get to watch shows as sexy and romantic as BBC One’s Poldark. If you’ve ever had an obsession with history, great makeout sessions and class differences overcome by love, then Poldark is the show for you. Based on a series of novels first published by Winston Graham in 1945, the show follows Ross Poldark, a British officer during the American Revolution, who returns home to find his father dead and his fiancée about…

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Visual Thinking: Temple Grandin’s TED Talk and a Book List to Give You Perspective

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April is National Autism Awareness Month, and it’s worth it to take a minute to celebrate the innumerable ways people are unique. Animal behavior pioneer Temple Grandin has been an Autism advocate and activist for years, and in her talk from TED2010, she shares her distinctive outlook on the world. She breaks down the main ways people on the “continuum” of Autism can develop as thinkers, and expands on her own experience as a visual thinker. For Grandin, her visual thinking allowed her insights into detail-oriented problem solving that the people around her missed – and in this talk, she makes it clear that young people today on the Autism spectrum have just as much potential as she did. In…

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International Women’s Day: Highlighting Six of Our Favorite Female Authors

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March 8 is International Women’s Day, which means we’re celebrating all those women from around the globe who inspire and entertain us. It’s easy to keep yourself in an Americanized bubble, only reading stories from the familiar authors we know and love. But the international book community is vast and vibrant, filled with writers from all different cultures and nationalities. In honor of all the talented women across the world, here are six international female authors (and their most recent books!) that you should be reading immediately: Lone Star, Paullina Simons (William Morrow, November 2015) I fell hard for Simons’ Bronze Horseman series, about an epic romance that starts in communist Russia during World War II and spans decades and continents. Since…

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Review: The Sensual Life of M.F.K. Fisher Reimagined in ‘The Arrangement’

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Preeminent food writer M.F.K. Fisher once wrote: “It seems to me that our three basic needs, for food and security and love, are so mixed and mingled and entwined that we cannot straightly think of one without the others.” Novelist Ashley Warlick gets to the heart of Fisher’s fervent beliefs in The Arrangement (Viking; February 9, 2016), an extraordinary novel that reimagines the love triangle that wreaked havoc on Fisher’s marriage in the 1930s. You don’t have to be familiar with Mary Frances Kennedy Fisher, or her pen name, or her vast body of work to feel the irresistible pull of this story, the Indie Next pick for February. Fisher destroyed many of the letters and journals in which she…

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Elvis Costello Shares the Books That are Most Important to Him

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Famous singer/songwriter Elvis Costello has a way with words. His songs are often darkly funny and filled with stories. Not only is he a magician with words when it comes to songwriting, but Costello recently added author to his list of achievements, proving once again just how much of a wordsmith he truly is. Unsurprisingly, he’s also a reader at heart and told New York Public Library some of his favorite literary cautionary tales. The Pat Hobby Stories, F. Scott Fitzgerald (Benediction Classics, 2011) Adolf Hitler: My Part In His Downfall, Spike Milligan (Viking Books, 2012) My Last Sigh, Luis Buñuel (Vintage Books, 2013) For the full post on Costello’s favorite books, visit NYPL.org.  

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Review: Geraldine Brooks’ The Secret Chord Breathes New Life into King David

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In The Secret Chord (Viking, October 6, 2015), a splendid re-imagining of King David’s life, Geraldine Brooks harmonically blends historical record with her gift for breathing life into people and events that have shaped our world. Brooks won the Pulitzer Prize for her 2005 novel March which takes place in America during the Civil War. The Silent Chord draws its inspiration from events occurring in Israel during the Second Iron Age, the time when David ruled. Beyond his slaying of Goliath, his talent as a harpist and his achingly beautiful psalms, few are familiar with David’s full story. But Brooks, who says she was inspired to write The Secret Chord after her 9-year-old son began playing the harp, paints a…

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Heat Index: 5 Hot New Books Deserving of Their Own Category

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Have you ever had a completely random pile of books that you’re dying to read but don’t know which one to start first? That was my dilemma this week for Heat Index. Each of the books that I picked is fabulous in its own right, but I just didn’t have a category that each one fit in. That is, until I had five of them and the category made itself! From a magical and dystopian world, to WWII, to love a second time around, there’s something here for everybody. The Gilded Life of Matilda Duplaine, Alex Brunkhorst (MIRA Books, September 22, 2015) “Brunkhorst’s story is full of memorable characters and contains a first-rate plot; the latter will delightfully surprise the reader.…

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Heat Index: 5 Hot New Books That Take Us Out of This World

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This week’s Heat Index is all about getting out of this world. Not only are there sorcerers in different dimensions, but strap in for haunted ruins, wars and romance as we explore these five new releases that are sure to bring out the mystical side of every book lover. Sometimes all we really want is to escape from our every day lives and jump into a pool of illusion, even just for a short time. If nothing else, these reads will allow you to expand the mind and explore the many realms they have to offer. Six of Crows, Leigh Bardugo (Henry Holt and Co., September 29) “Cracking page-turner with a multi ethnic band of misfits with differing sexual orientations who…

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