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veterans

Writer’s Bone Podcast: Jeff Shaara, Author of ‘The Frozen Hours’ on Writing About the Korean War

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Jeff Shaara, author of Gods and Generals and The Fateful Lightning, returns to the podcast to discuss his new novel, The Frozen Hours. Shaara talks to Daniel Ford about consulting with Korean War veterans, how he chose the characters featured in this narrative, and why, in large part because of those veterans, his writing process was more emotional this time around. To learn more about Jeff Shaara, visit his official website or like his Facebook page. Also listen to our last podcast interview with Shaara and read our review of The Frozen Hours in December’s “Books That Should Be On Your Radar.”   Want to be a published writer? Enter our writing contest, where you could become a BookTrib Contributor! Deadline…

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Writer’s Bone Podcast: Sitting Down With Lysa Heslov, Director of ‘Served Like A Girl’

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Image courtesy of IMDb.Lysa Heslov, director of “Served Like A Girl,” talks to Sean Tuohy about how she changed as a person and filmmaker while making the documentary, the unbreakable bond she formed with the female veterans, and her next equally complex and emotional project. To learn more, visit the official website for “Served Like A Girl,” like its Facebook page, or follow Heslov and the film on Twitter @heslov_lysa and @servedlikeagirl, respectively. See the official trailer for Heslov’s, Serve Like a Girl:   Be a BookTrib Ambassador!  Sign up NOW for our weekly newsletter.  

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‘Charlie Mike’: The Story of Veterans Who Continue to Serve Through Team Rubicon

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The woman at the Red Cross said Port-au-Prince, Haiti was too dangerous for untrained volunteers after the earthquake when Marine veteran Jake Wood called to volunteer in January 2010. “It’s complete chaos there,” she said. “I’m a marine,” he replied. “We do chaos.” Wood hung up the phone and started calling fellow veterans. One who responded was fellow Marine vet William McNulty. They had only spoken on the phone and when they met 24 hours later in the airport in the Dominican Republic, they cobbled together a team consisting of the vets, a firefighter, an ER physician, an obstetrician and a medic. They had little more than their go-bags, some money and a passion to serve. They created medical triage…

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When Books Went to War to fight facism with freedom of expression

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When Nazi Germany began invading neighboring countries in the 1930s it not only declared war on freedom, liberty, and tolerance—it declared war on the printed page as well. By 1941, the Nazis had banned and burned more than 100 million books and had driven terrified citizens to hide or destroy many more. But as the United States entered the war, books fought back. Molly Guptill Manning’s When Books Went to War (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2014) tells the remarkable tale of the power of literacy in the face of totalitarianism. It describes how an army of American librarians, along with the U.S. publishing industry, struck back against fascism and helped our men and women in uniform win the war. “American librarians…

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Enabling our wounded warriors with voice-activated computers

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As we observe Veterans Day, it’s time to remember that our wounded heroes have dreams when they come home from the battlefield. As we need them to preserve our freedom, they need us to overcome the bonds of the mental or physical damage they’ve sustained so that they can be free to pursue their own dreams. I served in the Navy long ago in the waters of Vietnam. In the tumultuous years following that unpopular war, I focused on education, family and career. I enjoyed the VFW and informal veterans’ groups where the community of shared experience provided support. Late in life, I learned a new joy: I love to write fiction. When my current novel, Jaspar’s War, was about…

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Get closer to the veterans who sacrificed for us through these great books

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Each year, we pause on the 11th day of the 11th month to acknowledge and give thanks to the countless veterans who have served our country. And while those who haven’t served can recognize the contributions of veterans, it can be difficult to truly understand the depths of sacrifice those service members and their families have made so that we can be free. Thanks to books, though, we have a window into the experience of veterans and their families, whether it be that of an Army sergeant who dodges gunfire to save the lives of wounded comrades, a young boy who waits at the airport for a parent to return from active duty, or an Army captain trying to unravel…

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WIN: The First Eagles; How Yanks took the skies in World War I

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Today is an age of unparalleled military might in the skies for the United States. The U.S. Air Force boasts more than 5,600 aircraft and 450 intercontinental ballistic missiles. Sixty-five Air Force satellites orbit the Earth. More than 332,000 active personnel man this mighty arsenal, to which more than $140 billion of America’s budget is devoted. Today, in an era in which unmanned military drones are the cutting edge of aerial warfare, it’s difficult to imagine a time when the United States didn’t rule the skies. Yet, only 100 years ago, the U.S. military consisted of a measly five aircraft, with no training programs or recruitment procedures in place. German dirigibles, not airplanes, were feared as “ominous weapons” of warfare.…

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