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the new yorker

Guest Blogger: Of Fame and the Absurd in “Hits and Misses”

in Girly Book Club by

Hits and Misses, a collection of humorous short stories, is a backstage pass to Simon Rich’s fears and neuroses. And that is a good thing. In “The Baby,” we meet Ben, a writer struggling to finish his book before the birth of his son. During a routine ultrasound, Ben discovers his unborn child is writing a novel, one that is lauded by the publishing world as suspenseful and lyrical – which is exactly what Ben had been hoping people would say about his novel. It is a story of father-son jealousy… except the son is still in the womb. “Birthday Party” is a clever take on a timeless, nostalgic idea: what would happen if you were given the chance to…

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Tara Isabella Burton’s Debut and Deadly Relationships

in Thrillers by

This year, we’ve seen a lot of books that seem to just raise the bar on what we can expect from literature in terms of mesmerizing plots, spellbinding characters and twists no one ever saw coming. But debut novel Social Creature, with its eye-catching cover that stops you in your tracks may just have raised the bar above all the others. Equally hypnotic and provocative, the novel focuses on the friendship between two women: Louise living on her own, barely making rent with no real relationships with anyone, not even her own family; and Lavinia, living in an apartment on the Upper East Side, funded by her parents, and taking part in everything the high life in New York has to offer.…

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The Privileges and Difficulties of Editing Greatness

in Potpourri by

I’ve had the privilege of editing the work of writers who have published many books and have come to Delphinium later on in their careers. Editing a master is very different than editing a new writer. Established authors have managed to stay in the game for decades and beyond their sheer talent, they’ve had to develop a dogged perseverance to keep writing and publishing despite the success or failure of their previous books. Not to mention the fact that each of these authors have had bad experiences with editors who, while admiring their work enough to publish it, perhaps never digested it fully enough to be able to edit carefully and successfully. Being a writer myself and watching the relative…

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‘Cat Person’ and ‘Zola’: Two Viral Shorts, Two Different Reactions

in Fiction by

Spoilers for ‘Cat Person’ ahead! This week, a short story in The New Yorker took the Internet by storm. Cat Person, written by Kristen Roupenian, is about two individuals meeting, texting, and eventually going on a lackluster date. Told from the point-of-view of Margot, a 20-year-old college student, the piece encapsulates what it means to date as a young woman. Cat Person explores the fantasies, insecurities, and looming threat of danger that women, in general, face on the dating scene. Margot’s 34-year-old date, Robert, is also guilty of projecting his fantasies onto the dating experience, and by the end, he turns on Margot in a way that feels all too real for many women who took to Twitter to express their…

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VIDEO: 15 Minutes with Amy Bloom: New York Times Best Selling Author Talks with BookTrib About Her New Novel, ‘White Houses’

in Non-Fiction by

Watch our new author video interview, “15 minutes with… Amy Bloom” now! Here, we talk about her new novel , White Houses, how a First Lady overcomes challenges from her past to find love, and the many letters that inspired her writing.   You don’t want to miss this interview brought to you by NetGalley, Meryl Moss Media and BookTrib.com. White Houses will be released February 13, 2018 by Penguin Random House. Read a preview of White Houses below:   ABOUT THE AUTHOR Author of two New York Times best sellers and three collections of short stories, a children’s book and a ground-breaking collection of essays. She’s been a nominee for both the National Book Award and the National Book Critics Circle Award. Her…

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Rose McGowan to Release ‘Brave’ New Book on Harvey Weinstein and Sexual Harassment in Hollywood

in Non-Fiction by

Rose McGowan has been very vocal in addressing sexual harassment in Hollywood, and specifically, against Harvey Weinstein, whom she says assaulted her in a hotel room in 1997. The two reached a settlement of $100,000, but that hasn’t stopped McGowan for speaking out in support of Weinstein’s other accusers. Since the news about Weinstein’s conduct, McGowan has been naming names: calling out people who knew and said nothing as well as those known to harass, including Ben Affleck. In one case where social media is used for good, McGowan has repeatedly tweeted about Weinstein’s history as a sexual predator. Her Twitter account was suspended for 12 hours after she posted information that violated the site’s community standards. Backlash was swift with…

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Sex, Voyeurism, A Legendary Journalist And The Thin Line Between Fact And Fantasy

in Non-Fiction by

Ever go to a hotel and wonder if anyone is watching you? Voyeur, a documentary shown this weekend at the Hamptons Film Festival about well-known journalist Gay Talese and motel owner Gerald Foos, the voyeur who chose him to write his story. It started more than thirty years earlier when Foos wrote a letter to Talese. Foos owned a small motel in Aurora Colorado that he turned into a laboratory designed specifically to spy on his clientele. In April, 2016 a controversial excerpt from Talese’s upcoming book The Voyeur’s Motel was published  in The New Yorker. Just before the book’s release, The Washington Post ran a story stating the book had factual inconsistencies threatening to destroy the story Talese was working on…

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The Romantic Storytelling of Foster Huntington’s Van Life

in Fiction by
van life foster huntington

A lot of us dream of packing up our lives and taking to the open road. Few of us actually end up doing it. But that’s not the case for Foster Huntington, author of the upcoming book, Van Life: Your Home on the Road. In 2011, Huntington left his New York City life behind and moved into a Volkswagen van. He traveled around the country, surfing, taking photos, making new friends, and chronicling his journey on Instagram and Tumblr with the hashtag #vanlife. His popularity grew, and soon thousands of users were commenting on his photos, following his lifestyle, and even taking it up themselves. After a profile in the New Yorker in April, Huntington’s bohemian way of life was…

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Spartan Up! Andrew Marantz Discusses the Drawback of Instant Gratification

in Non-Fiction by

Andrew Marantz, a freelance writer for The New Yorker and Men’s Journal and a number of other publications, sat down with Spartan Up’s Joe De Sena, founder and CEO of Spartan Race, during the Spartan Cruise to talk about the misleading mantra to “live each day as if it were your last,” and the disservice of constant instant gratification in life. Marantz also tackles the topic of what drives success and achievement. Is it chemicals in the brain or something else entirely? For more, watch the Podcast above. ABOUT SPARTAN UP! THE PODCAST: Every day, Joe De Sena, founder and CEO of Spartan Race and a New York Times bestselling author, inspires millions of people all over the world to get off the couch…

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