Tag archive

The Catcher in the Rye

Laurie Petrou’s Sibling Rivalry on Steroids

in Thrillers by

In Laurie Petrou’s Sister of Mine (Crooked Lane Books), the lives of two orphaned sisters, Hattie and Penny, begin to fray as longstanding resentments, sibling rivalry and unpaid debts overflow and the ties of sisterhood start to snap. It’s a fast-paced thriller by Petrou, a debut novelist who also is an Associate Professor at Ryerson’s RTA School of Media and speaks on topics such as gender and rejection. See what she has to say about her first work, family relationships, and her own literary journey. BookTrib: You’ve said you never set out to write suspense. How did Sister of Mine evolve into the thriller it is? Laurie Petrou: In order for the sisters’ relationship to be put to a test, there…

Keep Reading

How To Judge A Book By Its Cover: 18 Famous Books

in Potpourri by

Have you ever stopped to think about how your favorite books’ covers were conceptualized? The Grapes of Wrath cover artist, Elmer Hader, made a living illustrating children’s books with his wife, and that’s how John Steinbeck discovered his work. The stories behind some of the most iconic book covers are truly fascinating, and this infographic from Invaluable highlights some of the most recognized throughout history. Check out how each designer brought their visions to life!   Want more BookTrib? Sign up NOW for news and giveaways!

Keep Reading

Now Trending: Could New J.D. Salinger Books Be on the Horizon?

in Fiction by

J.D. Salinger has been in the spotlight in recent weeks – something the famously reclusive author would probably have hated. But between the September biopic, Rebel in the Rye, and a recent New York Times article about possible new books from the author, he’s getting more attention than ever. It begs the question: how would Salinger feel about all of this renewed interest in his life and art? About a week ago, The New York Times ran an article titled, “So Where Are the New J.D. Salinger Books We Were Promised?” In it, they wonder at the presence of new work by the author, who, according to several sources, kept writing long after his final authorized publication in 1965. A…

Keep Reading

The 3 greatest YA novels ever written?

in Fiction by

It’s I Read YA Week: that one week of the year where all readers, regardless of age, come together to celebrate their love of young adult literature. As a longtime YA fan, I’m always a little annoyed when I’m asked to defend my love of books aimed at “children.” I was especially annoyed when Slate published an article by Ruth Graham last year called, “Yes, Adults Should be Embarrassed to Read Young Adult Books”. My thoughts on the whole scandal are pretty well documented, but needless to say, I had some issues with the idea that any sort of shame or embarrassment should be attached to a reading experience. Though birthed out of the negative backlash towards young adult literature, I…

Keep Reading

Coming of age with Catcher in the Rye author, J.D. Salinger

in Non-Fiction by

Catcher in the Rye—the quintessential coming of age novel—made J.D. Salinger one of the most famous American authors of all time. Though it was first published almost 65 years ago, it is still an iconic book in the American canon, and its once reclusive author, who died in 2010, still holds a prominent place in the hearts of his fans. We recently sat down with author Joanna Rakoff, whose new memoir, My Salinger Year (Knopf, June) details the year she spent working for J.D. Salinger’s literary agent, to ask her thoughts on what it means today to come of age, and how she was affected by her relationship with one of the most mysterious literary figures of our time. BOOKTRIB:…

Keep Reading

Ten lyrical and lovely literary tattoos

in Potpourri by

You have to really love something to get it tattooed on your body. And I mean really love something — once it’s in your skin, that ink isn’t going anywhere. Even if you get it removed, there will always be a scar. Because of their permanence, tattoos can be a scary endeavor. But I can’t think of anything more worthy of permanent ink than something from my favorite novel. Certain books and quotes stay with you for a lifetime—so why not wear them forever on your skin? Luckily, I’m not the only one who feels this way. Here are ten literary tattoos that inspire us (or maybe just fill us with extreme tattoo-envy):   Where the Sidewalk Ends by Shel…

Keep Reading

My dear, you SHOULD give a damn

in Fiction by

Lists are everywhere. Books are everywhere. So it makes sense that lists about books are omnipresent. There are lists of the best books ever written, the worst books ever written, the books you should read before you die, the books you should read to make sure you never die (immortal vampires, anyone?), and everything in between. I hate to be the one to break it to you that it is impossible for you to read all the books currently in publication, let alone the thousands coming down the pike. Even with that new-fangled app that purports to let you read a novel in 90 minutes (that’s a gripe for another time), you simply won’t get to turn every page of…

Keep Reading

Rebellious teen Holden would definitely be rocking some leather in the 21st century

in Fiction by

Last week we designed looks for classic-novel heroines, and now it’s time to dress the men. Find out what Holden Caulfield might wear as he wanders a 21st century New York, or what social-climbing Pip would put on before visiting Mrs. Havisham in her dilapidated mansion. These four men are definitely well-dressed, and—for some reason—considerably hotter when you picture them in modern clothes. First, the covers to get you in the mood.   And on to our dapper heroes! Great Expectations: Pip   A modern day Pip would be a little bit trendy and a little bit classic. His roots wouldn’t necessarily reflect who he has become, but his look would always have a touch of this-guy-is-trying-too-hard. Still, he’d definitely gain…

Keep Reading

Go to Top