Tag archive

Tara Westover

Kushner Goes Inside Women’s Prison in “The Mars Room”

in Non-Fiction by

Two-time National Book Award finalist Rachel Kushner’s new book, “The Mars Room” tells the story of Romy Hall who was serving two consecutive life sentences plus six years at the Stanville Women’s Correction Facility in California’s Central Valley. Roxanne says that the book “informs our understanding of prison life in a woman’s correctional facility in thrilling and ironic detail” and “helps us ponder a society that gives rise to these inevitabilities, disappointments, and injustices.” Also in this episode, we welcome back Lissa Muscatine, the owner of Politics & Prose in Washington DC for our segment “What’s on The Front Table.” Books in this episode: The Mars Room by Rachel Kushner The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky To purchase any of the books recommended by…

Keep Reading

Just the Right Book Podcast: Linda Fairstein’s ‘Digging for Trouble’ and 11 Books to Read Now

in Podcasts by

Former Books on The Nightstand host, “rep extraordinaire” and frequent guest Michael Kindness is back to add to your winter reading list! Also in this episode, Roxanne speaks to author and former New York City prosecutor Linda Fairstein, the writer of 19 internationally best-selling Alex Cooper novels. Fairstein stopped by Just the Right Book Podcast to chat about her kids book Digging for Trouble, the second book in her Devlin Quick Mysteries. The story follows twelve-year-old supersleuth Devlin Quick as she heads to Montana to dig out dinosaur bones, but instead discovers a mystery. So what inspired Linda to write about dinosaurs besides her love for New York City’s Museum of Natural History? She explains learning that “Montana, Wyoming, and…

Keep Reading

Tragic, Praiseworthy and Monumental: Review of Tara Westover’s ‘Educated’

in Non-Fiction by

Tara Westover’s coming-of-age story in her memoir Educated, is incredible, tragic, praiseworthy and monumental.  From a young girl loving and believing everything her parents tell her, to questioning their logic and actively pursuing different answers and other ways of thinking, Westover has always had the inherent desire to know more. Reminiscent of Jeanette Walls’s The Glass Castle, Tara lives with her survivalist family in the mountains of Idaho, and similar to Leah Remini’s account of her time as a scientologist in Troublemaker, she begins to realize that everything she has been told may not be the truth, and though fiercely loyal to her parents and siblings, she feels trapped and begins to question their unconventional way of life. Growing up working in a…

Keep Reading

Go to Top