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Sylvia Plath

Wednesday Wisdom Amazing Tips for Writers from the Most Prolific of All Time

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People always ask me what my writing “process” is. If they knew, they wouldn’t believe me, most times it involves just sitting alone and listening to my own thoughts. Rrely does it ever involve me sitting in front of a blank screen on my computer; if I’m typing, it is already written, I am just transcribing the pages in my head. About 90 percent of what I write has been written in my dreams and that is because I spend about 90 percent of my time thinking about writing. My inspiration comes from a variety of sources, most are just random occurrences and rather than keeping my thoughts and opinions about these to myself, I share them with you. Writing…

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#WednesdayWisdom for Writers from Some of the Most Prolific Writers of All Time

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People always ask me what my writing “process” is. If they knew, they wouldn’t believe me, most times it involves just sitting alone and listening to my own thoughts. Rrely does it ever involve me sitting in front of a blank screen on my computer; if I’m typing, it is already written, I am just transcribing the pages in my head. About 90 percent of what I write has been written in my dreams and that is because I spend about 90 percent of my time thinking about writing. My inspiration comes from a variety of sources, most are just random occurrences and rather than keeping my thoughts and opinions about these to myself, I share them with you. Writing…

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‘Letters of Sylvia Plath’: The Woman Behind the Writing

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During Sylvia Plath’s first semester at Smith College, she wrote to her mother, saying “I’m so happy here I could cry!” At the same time, she was writing in her journal about the depression and anxiety she has fallen into. She was a very private person, who didn’t share much of her life publicly. What we do know of Plath, we know from her writing: her journals (the ones that her husband Ted Hughes didn’t burn after her death), her one and only book The Bell Jar, and her poetry, which was intensely private – each one seemed like an excerpt from her diary. The Letters of Sylvia Plath, Volume I: 1940-1956 document her letters and correspondences over the years, a good amount to…

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Summer Reading Redemption: English Class Reads that Deserve Second Chances

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High school sucked, right? Totally. Anyway, remember all those books you had to read? Turns out some of them were pretty good! Overcome your pimply PTSD and revisit some classics you may have overlooked back in the day. Matt’s Take Hey, who remembers high school? Because I sure don’t. My terrible bouts of awkwardness and raging hormones made sure I blocked out the majority of those four years. But some memories just stick, like assigned readings, and getting rejected by cheerleading captain Joanna Michaels*. Damn, she was ice cold. If you were at all like me in high school, there were some books you enjoyed and some you flat-out hated. We enjoy doing things on our own time, not when…

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Five authors whose fame rests on a single great novel

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“When he was nearly thirteen, my brother Jem got his arm badly broken at the elbow.” And so begins Harper Lee’s seminal 1960 novel, To Kill a Mockingbird, where we’re introduced to young Jean Louise “Scout” Finch, her brother and protector, Jem, and their father, the wise attorney and champion for justice Atticus Finch. Equal parts coming-of-age tale, Southern Gothic, and social commentary, Mockingbird—this is the pre-Katniss Everdeen version featuring the bird—is one of the most beloved novels of the 20th century. In 2006, in a poll conducted in Britain, librarians ranked it as the book every adult should read (it came in ahead of the Bible). The themes—racial inequality, rape, loss of innocence—are as resonant today as they were…

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6 Most Quotable Lines of Poetry

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There are some lines of poetry so evocative that once read they resonate in the heart and mind forever. To celebrate National Poetry Month, the poetry nerds at BookTrib have gathered some of the most quotable lines from the great poets. This is just a sampling—your favorite line of poetry might be missing. If it is, please share it with us in the comments section. If we get several good ones we might just do another round of poetry memes. When great work is shared everyone benefits.

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Ten most memorable lines from literature by female authors

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In this second installment of BookTrib’s continuing series that aims to bring you, dear reader, 50 of the most memorable lines in literature, you’ll have lots of fodder for those late-night trivia sessions at the bar. Or just some pithy responses to everyday questions. How do you work classic literature into your daily life? And, as always, we welcome your suggestions in the comments. Books and the literary lifestyle thrive when shared. As an added bonus, since 2014 is the Year of Reading Women, this week’s installment offers ten brilliant gems from women writers.   1. To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee Advice as easily applicable as to writing as it is to how we live our lives, Atticus…

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