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Sex and the City

Sarah Jessica Parker On Her Imprint and Empowering Women

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Sarah Jessica Parker who is best known for her iconic role as Carrie Bradshaw is also a producer, designer, and now a publisher, recently launching her own imprint, SJP for Hogarth. In a rare and revealing interview, the Sex and the City star opens up to Roxanne on several hot topics. They discuss not only the imprint, but the series’ impact on the role of women in society, the importance of pay equality for working mothers, and recent movements #MeToo and #TimesUp. Roxanne and SJP were delighted to discover that they had several book interests in common, even swapping book recommendations. Parker says her mother instilled in her the valuable habit of reading at a young age. “You couldn’t leave the house without something…

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Jennifer Keishin Armstrong: “Sex and the City and Us”

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Jennifer Keishin Armstrong, author of Mary and Lou and Rhoda and Ted and Seinfeldia, returns to the podcast to discuss her new book Sex and the City and Us (out June 5). To learn more about Jennifer Keishin Armstrong, visit her official website, like her Facebook page, or follow her on Twitter and Instagram. Also listen to our first interview with the author. Want more BookTrib? Sign up NOW for news and giveaways!

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5 of TV’s Most Lackluster Kisses & the Books that Did it Better

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Any romance lover knows that it’s all about the kiss. Maybe the couple is standing in the rain. Maybe one person is stroking the other’s face. Maybe they’re already tearing each other’s clothes off on the way to the nearest bed. Or, in a perfect world, it’s all three at once. (Hellloooo, Notebook.) But sometimes the kiss is just not good. The lips are getting jammed together awkwardly. There’s just no chemistry. You’re not always sure why, but a bad kiss is kind of like pornography: you know it when you see it. Regardless of the reason, here are the top five worst TV kisses and the books that did it better: Carrie & Big in an Elevator, Sex and…

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Dearly Departed: Boys Who Need to Bounce

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I’m a big fan of romance. My motto is: the more kissing, the better. And for the most part, I’m willing to give characters the benefit of the doubt. For example, her old flame just showed up and he’s wreaking havoc in her life? No problem. Her new co-worker keeps giving her the eye? Let’s see what happens. But every once in a while I run into a couple that just doesn’t work. Their love is too needy, too filled with lies and cheating, or just plain boring. So, armed with a vivid imagination and the power of the Internet, I’ve decided to “fix” these broken couples, even though it may result in a “ship” war. Here are two relationships I…

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Four Quartets Better Than the Fantastic Four

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Friday marks the opening of Fantastic Four, the latest movie version of the publication that launched the Silver Age of Comics, which established Marvel as a major force in the medium, and began the decades-long run of the periodical that billed itself as “The World’s Greatest Comic Magazine!” What made FF such a classic? Was it how much we loved the characters—Reed Richard’s nerdiness, Johnny Storm’s fiery personality, Sue Storm’s sweetness or Ben Grimm’s heart of gold? Was it their cool powers? After all, who wouldn’t want to streak across the sky, leaving a trail of flames in their wake? Or turn invisible? Or have the strength of 100 men? Or…stretch like Reed? (OK, the stretching thing has always been…

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Walking in Carrie Bradshaw’s shoes

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We’ve known Carrie Bradshaw for almost twenty years, have followed the ups and downs of her turbulent relationships, her writing career, and her long-time friendships. We’ve learned where she came from, and how she first found her way to New York City. We’ve envied her escapades, her trademark wit, and of course, her wardrobe. More than anything else, Carrie Bradshaw is known for her style. And her style all comes down to her shoes.   Readers first fell in love with the character of Carrie Bradshaw in the pages of Candace Bushnell’s 1996 book, Sex and the City. Carrie truly came to life, though, in the HBO series that ran from 1998-2004, where she was played by Sarah Jessica Parker.…

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