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Rolling Stone

“Joni on Joni:” Portrait Of An Artist Through Interviews

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She’s been called bragging and scornful, philosophical and deep, and also a beguiling flirt.  All those sides show up in a fascinating anthology of Joni Mitchell’s most illuminating interviews titled Joni on Joni: Interviews and Encounters with Joni Mitchell (Chicago Review Press), edited by Susan Whitall, writer and editor of Creem magazine. The interviews span the years 1966 to 2014 and cover everything from her friends to her insights to her music. Collectively, the material paints a revealing picture of the artist. Few artists of the 20th century are as intriguing as Joni Mitchell. She was a solidly middle-class, buttoned-up bohemian, an anti-feminist who loved men but scorned free love; and a female warrior taking on the male music establishment.…

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‘Cat Person’ and ‘Zola’: Two Viral Shorts, Two Different Reactions

in Fiction by

Spoilers for ‘Cat Person’ ahead! This week, a short story in The New Yorker took the Internet by storm. Cat Person, written by Kristen Roupenian, is about two individuals meeting, texting, and eventually going on a lackluster date. Told from the point-of-view of Margot, a 20-year-old college student, the piece encapsulates what it means to date as a young woman. Cat Person explores the fantasies, insecurities, and looming threat of danger that women, in general, face on the dating scene. Margot’s 34-year-old date, Robert, is also guilty of projecting his fantasies onto the dating experience, and by the end, he turns on Margot in a way that feels all too real for many women who took to Twitter to express their…

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Just the Right Book Podcast: Inside the WSJ’s Book List; Jeff Goodell’s ‘The Water Will Come’

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Looking for a good book to curl up with this winter? We’ve got you covered! In this week’s episode of Just the Right Book Podcast Roxanne is joined by Ellen Gamerman, the Arts and Culture reporter for the Wall Street Journal. Ellen takes us inside the Journal and shares some winter reads and even talks Oscars. Also, in this episode Roxanne speaks to author, journalist, and Rolling Stone contributor Jeff Goodell about his latest book, The Water Will Come. Goodell, who has covered climate change for fifteen years, has previously written five books on topics such as the coal industry, Geoengineering and even a memoir about growing up in Silicon Valley. We have certainly heard the doomsday scenarios of the impact of climate change, the warming ocean, the melting glaciers, and…

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Remembering the Many Artistic Faces of David Bowie

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It’s difficult to find the words to exactly describe David Bowie, who passed away January 10, just days after his 69th birthday and the release of his latest studio album, Blackstar. His mercurial image and musical style paved the way for many of the biggest names in popular music today, and his lyrics have transcended generations to become some of the most well-known and most beloved songs of all time. His son, director Duncan Jones, announced his father’s passing with a heart-wrenching tweet. Longtime producer Tony Visconti told Rolling Stone, “His death was not different from his life–a work of art. He made Blackstar for us, his parting gift.” A life as expansive and impactful as Bowie’s is difficult to…

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Video: Missed It? Interview with Chris Pan Launois and L’Americain: A Photojournalist’s Life

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Chris Pan Launois, son of John Launois, one of the top international photojournalists in the l960s, joins BookTrib for an exciting, entertaining and insightful Live Chat. Before television, the great picture magazines captured world events for millions of readers. They sent correspondents and photojournalists to the ends of the earth to record history in the making. Among this elite was the photographer, John Launois. During the 1960s and 1970s, the final decades of the “golden age of photojournalism,” John Launois blossomed as one of the most resourceful, inventive, prolific, highly paid, and widely traveled photojournalists at work during that period. Launois made himself the master of the deeply researched photo essay, and his published work appeared in Life, The Saturday…

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