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Pulitzer Prize

Early Bird Books: 8 Notable Books That Inspired Memorable Movies

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Books and movies have a relationship that’s as old as Hollywood itself. Together, writers and filmmakers have given us everything from great adaptations to huge disappointments, and some truly weird interpretations in between. But that comes with the territory of turning our favorite words into live action pieces of cinema. If you’re a fan of both books and movies, check out these eight books that inspired adaptations. The Color Purple, Alice Walker The Color Purple won the Pulitzer Prize in 1983 and went on to inspire the classic 1985 Steven Spielberg film of the same name. With apologies to Spielberg, Walker’s novel remains the definitive version of the story. Walker’s book uses a technique that film just can’t accommodate. The…

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Murder, He Wrote: The Night Of-Inspired Summer Reading

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Based solely on the first episode, the new HBO limited series, The Night Of, seems to be equal parts True Detective and NPR’s Serial in the best ways possible. The story follows a young man, Nasir Khan (who goes by Naz) who gets swept into a horrible crime after a night of misguided frivolity with a mysterious, beautiful woman. Naz, a college student, picks her up in his father’s cab on his way to the popular kids’ college party, and has a dreamlike night of sex, drugs and odd drunken knife games before waking up to a nightmare: the woman’s body has been stabbed to death in bed next to him. Naz, who clearly doesn’t watch a lot of Law & Order, flees…

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Review: Geraldine Brooks’ The Secret Chord Breathes New Life into King David

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In The Secret Chord (Viking, October 6, 2015), a splendid re-imagining of King David’s life, Geraldine Brooks harmonically blends historical record with her gift for breathing life into people and events that have shaped our world. Brooks won the Pulitzer Prize for her 2005 novel March which takes place in America during the Civil War. The Silent Chord draws its inspiration from events occurring in Israel during the Second Iron Age, the time when David ruled. Beyond his slaying of Goliath, his talent as a harpist and his achingly beautiful psalms, few are familiar with David’s full story. But Brooks, who says she was inspired to write The Secret Chord after her 9-year-old son began playing the harp, paints a…

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American Masters’ Filmmaker Discusses Harper Lee Documentary on PBS

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If you want to take part in the unprecedented literary celebration that is the release of Harper Lee’s Go Set a Watchman (Harper, July 14), the “parent” novel of her classic To Kill a Mockingbird, you don’t even have to leave your home—it’s coming to a television and computer near you. As part of the Watchman festivities, THIRTEEN, New York’s flagship public television station, is presenting “THIRTEEN Days of Harper Lee,” an on-air and online collection of programming celebrating the author and her work. One of THIRTEEN’s special programs will be an airing of an updated version of Harper Lee: Hey, Boo, a documentary by Emmy award-winning filmmaker Mary McDonagh Murphy. The airing will take place on THIRTEEN’s American Masters…

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Alison Lurie decodes the messages that buildings send in The Language of Houses

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Pulitzer Prize-winning author Alison Lurie proves once again that her view of the world is sharper than most with her latest book, The Language of Houses ( Delphinium Books, September). The book comes 30 years after its predecessor, The Language of Clothes, applying that book’s method of thought to houses in Lurie’s trademark crisp, smart prose style. But it’s not just houses that Houses examines. The Language of Houses thoughtfully considers the messages sent by all of the types of buildings, structures, and abodes that humans occupy—including schools, malls, office buildings, prisons, restaurants, and hotels. Lurie sees each of these “houses” as an accumulation of information meant to suggest particular moods and expectations and to elicit certain types of behaviors…

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