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Bad News Overload? 4 Books To Help You Through

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Suffering from bad news overload? Well, we have a couple of remedies. One is dancing…and the other is books, of course! Roxanne shares four books that are distracting, witty, and engaging! “…books offer us a way to learn and think, to make sense of the world, find peace for ourselves, or just offer us the pleasure of a well-written, utterly absorbing story” says Roxanne. Books in this episode: His Favorites: A Novel by Kate Walber On Writing by Stephen King Listen to the Marriage by John Jay Osborn Please Do Not Touch by Murray Moss and Franklin Getchell

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So, You Want to be a Writer? Keep Reading!

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I’m sampling canapés at a party when someone walks up with a J.K. Rowling gleam in their eye. “I hear that you’re an editor. I have this great idea for a book, but I’m not sure how to get started. What do you recommend?” As I stifle the urge to fling the hummus in their general direction, I recommend those classics that I’ve long used for classes, writing workshops and myself: On Writing Well: The Classic Guide to Writing Nonfiction (Harper Perennial, 2006) by William Zinsser, Bird by Bird: Some Instructions on Writing and Life by Anne Lamott (Anchor, 1995), and Writing Down the Bones: Freeing the Writer Within by Natalie Goldberg (Shambhala, 2005). For guys, I’ll usually toss in Stephen…

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Top 6 worst book covers ever?

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We are told to never judge a book by its cover, but when the covers look like this… It’s hard for this Bookish Diva not to be a tad judge-y. While it is easy to chuckle when self-published books have less than fabulous covers, what are we to do when good books are saddled with questionable covers? Can we fathom the greatness within?

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Brenda Novak discusses finding your story’s core

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I love nothing more than a hard-won happily-ever-after. Maybe that’s why I gravitate toward redemption stories. At some point, we’ve all done something we regret, created some challenge or obstacle we struggle to overcome. In This Heart of Mine, the latest addition to my Whiskey Creek series, Phoenix Fuller has been through quite a bit. She’s even served time. Now she’s out of prison and finally has a chance to make good, and she’s determined to do it. She’s different and admirable, but no one can see the admirable part at first, which is what makes the discovery of her true character so much fun—and what made her such an interesting personality to create. When I went to the RWA…

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OMG! It’s totes cray-cray. What happened to writing with a Sense of Style?

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OMG! How r u supposed 2 find gr8 writing these dayz? : – ( Ugh. With the advent of texting and social media, the self-appointed “Grammar Police” (and did Grammar Police even exist before the Internet?) are on a round-the-clock dragnet, bemoaning the downfall of the English language. Why do so many people write so poorly? Does the general public even care about good writing anymore? Should they? Should anyone? Fear not—appearances to the contrary on Facebook, Twitter, and the “Comments” section of your favorite Internet news page, all is well. The language endures. And a new usage guide—one crafted especially for today’s writer—has arrived to ensure that the language will thrive well into the new millennium. That new guide…

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Don’t quit your day job — it may make you a great writer

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It’s common for writers to claim day jobs stand between us and a published novel. I understand. For years I thought if only and when and someday. And yes, working one, two, three jobs at a time took a big bite out of what would certainly have been my fast track to a Pulitzer. But slogging through, learning at, loving and hating a number of jobs, that’s what formed and hold up my novels. The bosses I despised (especially them), the coworkers who became family, the ones who turned my stomach, those I supervised, fired, hired, found cheating, using drugs, selling drugs: They gave me worlds. The clients. The patrons. Here’s to all of them: Bartending: my top choice of…

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Long time, no publish? Authors who are worth the wait

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When Lorrie Moore released Bark: Stories (Knopf) in February of this year, it was with much ballyhoo. After all, 15 years had passed since her last collection of short stories—Birds of America, which garnered wide praise for its insight and humor, and was named a New York Times bestseller. If anyone expected Moore to miss a step after a long hiatus, that misguided reader was surely disappointed. It’s not uncommon for authors to go years between book releases. The creative process may account for some delay, and then there’s the business of selling a book: copyediting, jacket design, the sale of foreign rights, and the slow drumbeat of social media. That said, certain writers take more time than others. Here’s…

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GET IN THE SPOTLIGHT: 83rd Annual Writer’s Digest Writing Competition

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Writer’s Digest has been shining a spotlight on up-and-coming writers in all genres through its Annual Writing Competition for more than 80 years. Enter our 83rd Annual Writing Competition for your chance to win and have your work be seen by editors and agents. The winning entries of this writing contest will also be on display in the 83rd Annual Writer’s Digest Competition Collection. Extended Deadline: June 16, 2014 BookTrib has an offer you can’t refuse! Want 15% off the regular registration price?  [discountcode code=”BT1514″ side=”center”] Wondering what’s in it for you?  An announcement of the winner on the cover of Writer’s Digest* A 30-minute Platform Strategy Consultation with Chuck Sambuchino* A one-year subscription to Writer’s Digest eBooks A chance to win $3,000 in cash…

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