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obsessive-compulsive disorder

Excerpt: The Must-Read Guide for Anyone Dealing with Crippling OCD and Anxiety

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Below is an excerpt from the first chapter of Adam Shaw and Dr. Lauren Collaghan’s Pulling the Trigger: The Definitive Survival and Recovery Approach to OCD, Anxiety, Panic Attacks and Related Depression. Introduction COURAGE NOT FIGHT Accept Your Mind, Own It For What It Is. This Takes Courage, Not Fight All my life, from being a little boy to a fully grown man, I tried to suppress my thoughts and anxiety because I knew no better and because I felt compelled to fight them. I was frightened, ashamed of and appalled about my mind and my crippling thoughts. It was terrifying, lonely and debilitating. I constantly felt that I was on the edge of madness and that no one or…

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Could Vaccines and Antibiotics Prevent Mental Illness?

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Usually, mental illness grabs the public’s attention when it’s linked to a terrible tragedy, such as a mass shooting or a particularly heart-wrenching suicide. The public’s reaction usually is to mourn, and then to go about their lives. They dismiss the mentally ill by thinking, “These people are weak. They were brought up wrong. They’re crazy. They have something wrong with them.” Now, however, in her new book Infectious Madness: the Surprising Science of How We “Catch” Mental Illness (Little, Brown; October 6, 2015) award-winning investigative science writer Harriet A. Washington presents compelling evidence that mentally ill people weren’t merely “born that way.” She claims that many mental illnesses aren’t genetic. They’re caused by viruses, much the same way viruses…

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Review: Alexandra Kleeman’s Brilliant Debut “You Too Can Have a Body Like Mine”

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Think of Alexandra Kleeman as an heir to Dave Eggers and Douglas Coupland, with a hefty dollop of Margaret Atwood thrown in. Her debut novel, You Too Can Have a Body Like Mine (Harper Collins; August 25, 2015), is a full-on postmodern satire bursting with biting commentary on women’s body image, consumerism and conformity. Our narrator, known only as A, lives in a shared suburban apartment. She and her roommate, B, are physically similar and emotionally dependent, egging each other on to paranoia and anorexia. They eat nothing but popsicles and oranges. A’s boyfriend, C, has a penchant for watching porn and mansplaining. A obsesses over every aspect of her body – whether her eyesight, makeup, posture, sexuality or perpetual…

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