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BookTrib Q&A: Andrea Dunlop ‘Regrets Nothing’ about Her Love of The Big Apple

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In 2017, books with a strong female protagonists were super popular: Gillian Flynn’s Gone Girl and Liv Constantine’s The Last Mrs. Parrish are just two of the books that had everyone in love with a strong female lead last year. This year, we are about to see another wave of bold women in literature and one of those will come from Andrea Dunlop, author of Losing the Light: A Novel, and the novella Broken Bay. She Regrets Nothing: A Novel, is Dunlop’s latest work that combines complex characters, intrigue and the lights and sounds of the Big Apple. Leila Lawrence from the quiet town of Grosse Point, Michigan, becomes an orphan at the age of 23. At her mother’s funeral, three of her wealthy, albeit estranged cousins from New…

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Jewish History is Revisited in Martha Hall Kelly’s ‘Lilac Girls’

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If you missed the release of Lilac Girls, now is the time to buy the paperback. It is historical fiction based on true and harrowing events during World War II. For me, the Holocaust has always been mostly about how the Jews were prosecuted; a devastating time in our history across the world. But of course the Jewish people were not the only ones who were affected. Author Martha Hall Kelly gets up close and personal with Kasia, a young Polish girl with Jewish ancestry who is completing secret missions for the underground anti-war efforts and is captured by the Gestapo with her sister and her mother. One of these unforgettable characters is Herta, an out of work, German doctor…

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Famed Gossip Columnist Liz Smith Dies at Age 94

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Known as the “Queen of New York Tabloids”  and “The Grand Dame of Dish,” gossip columnist and write Liz Smith made a career reporting on the lives and lifestyles of the rich and famous. Smith began her career in the 1950’s working for Mike Wallace before writing the Cholly Knickerbocker column for Hearst Magazines. By the 1980’s, she had become the most powerful and celebrated tabloid writer living a life much like the people she dished on. Smith grew up listening to Walter Winchell radio broadcasts and longed for “the glamour and the excitement of New York”  for herself, she once said. In the late 40’s, she moved to NYC with only $50 dollars and no contacts in the publishing world…

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‘White Fur’: Is Love Really More Powerful Than Money?

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The more I think about this novel, the more I love White Fur by Jardine Libaire. It’s the 1980s and Elise, a school dropout and recently homeless young girl is living in New Haven with a friend she met on the street. Jamey is one of the white, privileged and wealthy guys in the apartment next door; the longtime buddies are students at Yale and everything material has been given to them on a silver platter. The unlikely attraction between Elise and Jamey is powerful, lustful and trepidatious on Jamey’s part, as Elise is from low-class, poor, unsophisticated stock, and although she has big love for her family and knows what she wants out of life, his fancy and pretentious family and…

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*NEW* Mayor of NYC Announces #MeatlessMondays at Gracie Mansion! We’ve Got Recipes!

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We love food, whether it’s a recipe that’s been passed down in the family, or updates on classics from our favorite stars. But we also want that food to be pretty healthy (we’re trying to be good, okay?), and when we heard the news that fifteen schools in Brooklyn, NY, are going to be having vegetarian meals every Monday (#meatlessmondays), we thought this would be a perfect opportunity to share some of the best vegetarian meals we’ve found with you. Mayor Bill de Blasio announced the new meal plan today, and will also be having vegetarian meals on Mondays, alongside Brooklyn Borough President Eric Adams, Schools Chancellor Carmen Fariña, and all of Gracie Mansion (the residence of the Mayor of New York…

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Steven Gaines is Insightful and Hilarious in ‘One of These Things First’

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In the memoir One of These Things First, Steven Gaines, a gay 15-year-old boy from a conservative Jewish family in the 1960s, humorously shares a bizarre account of his teenage years in Brooklyn and a stint at Payne Whitney, a private mental institution in NYC. Steven recalls a multitude of childhood memories, some disturbing, many sexually charged (think Augusten Burroughs and Running With Scissors). Gaines’ memories include his fantasies about the lawnmower guy, agonizing time spent in his grandfather’s bra and girdle store where he spies on shoppers while hidden from view, befriending an aspiring actress at the empty theater in town, dealings with a claustrophobic cooped up in a small apartment with his parents, and the mean boys in the neighborhood who…

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