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New York

Women Star Wars Writers at the New York Comic-Con

in Pop Culture by

This year at the New York Comic-Con, Mur Lafferty (“Solo: A Star Wars Story”), Katie Cook (“Star Wars: Search Your Feelings”), Justina Ireland (“Star Wars: Lando’s Luck”) and Delilah Dawson (“Star Wars: Phasma”) discuss new adventures for the classic characters we all know and love. Want more BookTrib? Sign up NOW for news and giveaways!  

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Chapter Closeup: Living a New York State of Mind

in Girly Book Club by

When Sam Flores volunteered to host the New York Chapter of the Girly Book Club (G.B.C.), she had no idea what she was signing up for. But she’s never looked back. As one would expect, the New York chapter is one of the network’s largest, with 3,500 members. Naturally, they can’t all attend the meetings, but a good mix of first-timers and returning women either pop in live or follow events online. Flores, by day a digital advertising manager for Time Inc., exemplifies the typical New Yorker in so many ways when she’s not buried in a book: taking advantage of 24-hour access to stores, restaurants, people-watching, traveling and training for this fall’s New York City Marathon. “My favorite part…

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“The Masterpiece:” NYC’s Grand Central as One of the Stars

in Fiction by

Today’s radiant Grand Central Terminal belies the nadir of its seventh decade when decay, crime, and overreaching developers threatened its existence. Thanks to the genius of landmark preservationists and Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis, the building was rescued and restored to its original beauty during the 1980s. The iconic Manhattan train terminal – specifically the Grand Central School of Art, part of an artists’ cooperative that was founded in 1924 and occupied much of the sixth floor of the building – is the star of The Masterpiece (Dutton), Fiona Davis’s third novel about New York City.  A romantic thriller about art and architecture, it is set against the unlikely backdrop of two of our nation’s most dispiriting eras:  the Great Depression of the…

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Impact On Countries & Time: Joan Silber’s “Improvement”

in Fiction by

Connecting 1970s Turkey and New York today, 72-year-old author Joan Silber, winner of the 2018 Pen/Faulkner Award for Fiction, weaves a tapestry of interpersonal connections and shows how relationships bind us together and decisions have widespread impact across countries and over time in her latest novel, Improvement (Amazon Digital Services). Reyna is a single mother living in Harlem and standing by her not-so-perfect boyfriend, Boyd, as she visits him during his three-month incarceration at Riker’s. Her Aunt Kiki lives in the Village after spending some time in Turkey and traveling the world in her younger days.  Kiki worries about Reyna and her young son Oliver and is unaware of the illegal activities Boyd, Reyna and their friends are involved with. When…

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Tara Isabella Burton’s Debut and Deadly Relationships

in Thrillers by

This year, we’ve seen a lot of books that seem to just raise the bar on what we can expect from literature in terms of mesmerizing plots, spellbinding characters and twists no one ever saw coming. But debut novel Social Creature, with its eye-catching cover that stops you in your tracks may just have raised the bar above all the others. Equally hypnotic and provocative, the novel focuses on the friendship between two women: Louise living on her own, barely making rent with no real relationships with anyone, not even her own family; and Lavinia, living in an apartment on the Upper East Side, funded by her parents, and taking part in everything the high life in New York has to offer.…

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Jennifer Keishin Armstrong: “Sex and the City and Us”

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Jennifer Keishin Armstrong, author of Mary and Lou and Rhoda and Ted and Seinfeldia, returns to the podcast to discuss her new book Sex and the City and Us (out June 5). To learn more about Jennifer Keishin Armstrong, visit her official website, like her Facebook page, or follow her on Twitter and Instagram. Also listen to our first interview with the author. Want more BookTrib? Sign up NOW for news and giveaways!

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‘The Immortalists’ Review: If You Knew You Were Going To Die Tomorrow, How Would You Live Today?

in Fiction by

In the summer of 1969, four children from a Jewish family on the Lower East Side of Manhattan visit a psychic and are told the date they will die.  Does this information, this prediction, change the way they choose to live?  That question is wrapped in mystery in The Immortalists, a story that takes us through each of the siblings’ lives. Author Chloe Benjamin provides us with a mesmerizing story of these rich characters, and their choices about how to live. Simon, the youngest brother, moves to California to live his truth and gets caught up in the sexual revolution of the 1980s. His sister Klara, who is irresponsible in many ways, chooses to become a magician. Daniel, the oldest brother,…

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Best of BookTrib 2017: VMA Week: Photographer Afshin Shahidi Gives BookTrib a ‘Private View’ of Icons Prince, Beyonce in an Exclusive Interview

in Non-Fiction by

Today we take a look at previous BookTrib posts that engaged hundreds to thousands of readers this past year. We’re taking a look back at some of your favorite posts before we kick off the new year! One of my favorite pictures of Prince is the cover photo of Afshin Shahidi’s forthcoming book, Prince: A Private View. One of the reasons I am so enamored of this picture is due to the striking contrast of black and white in Prince’s clothing against the simplistic set— what appears to be a plain hallway. What is even more endearing to me as a 30+ year fan is that Prince, who was of a smaller stature, even in the most ordinary of spaces…

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‘Never Out of Season’ Touches on a Science We Never Knew Existed, That of the Banana

in Non-Fiction by

The opening chapter of “Never Out of Season,” exposes the book premise flat out. It deals with the short history of the banana. This rather prosaic fruit, available in abundance, at least in New York, from every street vendors on most street corners, is not the result of simple happenstance or sustained popular delight. Its ubiquitous presence is both the product of refined methods of distribution and the result of a long selective agricultural process, an outcome we have grown to rely and take for granted. This hegemony of productivity is what Dunn, through this masterfully well-documented book replete with singular stories reading like detective stories, underlines with conviction to sound the alarm. Indeed, even if you do not buy…

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Just the Right Book Podcast: 42 Books That Will Make Your Holiday Wish List!

in Podcasts by

Whether you’re looking to get a jump on crafting your holiday wish list or just looking for a fantastic read, our literary experts have you covered! Our very own Roxanne Coady recently had the pleasure of hosting a live event with Penguin Random House publishing powerhouses Michael Kindness, Jennifer Black and author, Matthew Dicks. The event, which took place at the JCC in West Hartford, Connecticut, was titled “Buzz About Books” and Just the Right Book Podcast was there every step of the way! If you’re trying to fill your holiday wish list with amazing titles, look no further! Stay tuned after the events to hear what folks are reading, straight from the New York Public Library in New York…

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Chaos Hits Home for the Holidays in ‘The Boyfriend Swap’

in Romance by

If you are looking for an escape this holiday season, The Boyfriend Swap by Meredith Schorr is just what you need! We step in on an unforgettable character, Robyn, who is a teacher dating an actor. Her family would like for her to meet a guy with ambition and some success but they are always disappointed with the creative types she is drawn to. Sydney is a lawyer at her father’s law firm and she is dating a lawyer. Her father is obsessed with the law and tends to talk business incessantly; something she has no patience for. Ann Marie is Robyn’s roommate and she works for Sydney at the law firm.  The three girls were together at a wine party and…

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Hollywood Hypocrites: Industry Vet Herb Freed on Harvey Weinstein and Hollywood’s Casting Couch Era

in Non-Fiction by

I came to Los Angeles from New York to direct movies in 1972. I had entered the film business seven years earlier, after resigning my post as rabbi of Temple Beth Shalom in Lake Mahopac, N.Y. I began to study film at New York University privately and my first assignments were to produce and direct television commercials. I labored in that vineyard for more than five years. Among my clients were U.S. Steel, Pepsi-Cola and others, but I was button-holed as the director who excelled in beauty commercials. I made TV spots for Cover Girl, Breck, Clairol and Revlon. Why? I have no idea.   In 1970 I moved up to movies. My first feature film, A.W.O.L., was shot in Sweden out…

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A Bunny’s Tale: Gloria Steinem’s Shocking Exposé That Challenged Hugh Hefner’s Playboy Empire

in Non-Fiction by

After responding to an ad offering “attractive young girls” $200 a week to work at Hugh Hefner’s infamous New York Playboy Club, now-famous feminist, author, and activist, Gloria Steinem, donned the classic Bunny outfit and spent nearly a month working undercover as part of a searing Show Magazine exposé. In her New York Times bestselling book, Outrageous Acts and Everyday Rebellions, Steinem returns readers to that very assignment. In a series of diary-like entries, she reveals an ugly underside of a sexual revolution that Hefner populated with women dressed in revealing costumes and men who ogled them. As she reveals the shocking incidents that followed her hiring in late January of 1963, readers get an up-close look at the outrageous…

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Literary Luminaries and Celebrities Light Up the Hamptons for Authors Night 2017

in Potpourri by

Literary luminaries lit up the warm and misty evening at the 13th annual Authors Night to benefit the 120-year-old East Hampton Library. In case you didn’t know, this is event is said to be the premier literary event of the Hamptons and one of the nation’s leading annual literary celebrations.   When I arrived, the parking lot was already full and shuttles, golf carts and mini buses helped attendees get to the massive tent that held 100 authors and more than 2,500 guests. The mood inside the tent was electric and abuzz with excitement.  The first person I ran into was the “King of Shoes,” Steven Madden, who sold me shoes when I was in high school. He said he…

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‘Brewster’ is an Unforgettable and Sadly Poignant Read by Mark Slouka

in Fiction by

I can hardly wait to read the other books Mark Slouka has written to see if they are as gripping, sad and unforgettable as Brewster. Ostensibly, a novel about teenage friendship, Brewster is anything but a typical coming-of-age story. Plots develop side-by-side as they charge through the book like they’re racing. Just when you get caught up in the love triangle of Ray and Jon and Karen, you learn to be afraid of Ray’s father’s cruelty, fear for the safety of Ray’s little brother, and come to admire Karen’s unbelievably steadfast commitment. Jon is on the track team and training for a race, Ray is fighting his battles – both physical and emotional, Karen is lighting up the narrative with…

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Cook Your Way Around the World

in Potpourri by

BookTrib is partnering with Bookish to bring you more great content, including this article on the best cookbooks featuring foods from around the world.  The best part of traveling is getting to explore a new place and embrace the food, people, and culture. The worst part? It can be expensive. So this season we’re bringing some of your favorite travel destinations to you. Here are eight cookbooks that will bring the stories and flavors of different countries right into your kitchen. So what are you waiting for? Get ready to cook! Luke Nguyen’s Street Food Asia Chef Luke Nguyen, the King of Street Food, takes readers across Asia in this delectable cookbook. Instead of sitting down in restaurants, Nguyen explores the street food culture…

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