Tag archive

Marvel Comics

Comic fans, welcome the rise of the superheroine

in Fiction by

Batman. Superman. Spiderman. There’s no denying that when we think of superheroes, our minds conjure up a vision of a man in a cape, swooping in to save his city. But what about the female heroes? From Batgirl to Wonder Woman, we know they’re out there – and it’s way past time for superheroines to get their fair share of the glory. Luckily, the rest of the world seems to agree. From television to books, it seems like superheroines have been popping up everywhere recently. Take Arrow, for example. The CW show about the classic DC Comics hero, Green Arrow, started as a crusade by one masked man. But since it first aired in 2012, the show has grown to…

Keep Reading

Think Marvel is only for superhero fans? Think again

in Fiction by

We here at BookTrib don’t like to peek at spoilers, so we don’t know exactly what you’re going to see when Avengers: Age of Ultron opens on Friday. But whatever it is, it won’t be a superhero movie. Wait…what!? Will it be filled with costumed super-beings laying the smackdown on the bad guys? Yeah, it’ll have plenty of that. But what has made the Marvel Cinematic Universe (MCU) so brilliant is that its offerings go well beyond the adventures of the costumed crusader du jour. MCU movies aren’t really superhero movies—they’re movies from very specific genres with very specific messages that just happen to have superheroes in them. The hero that kicked things off for the MCU is a perfect…

Keep Reading

Marvel Cinematic Universe to Spider-Man: Welcome home, Web-slinger!

in Fiction by

OK, fanboys and girls, this is huge. This is bigger than huge. This is Marvel-ous! Ever since Sony Pictures Entertainment was electronically hacked last year, the blog-o-verse has been flooded with reports of Sony and Marvel Studios negotiating the return of the motion-picture rights to Spider-Man, Marvel’s most iconic hero, to the studio that is currently at the forefront of the recent wave of super-hero blockbusters. Every day, another rumor; every day, another denial or “no comment” from Marvel Studios head honcho Kevin Feige. Then came the blockbuster announcement to bust all blocks: Sony is retaining rights to Spidey, but it is partnering with Marvel Studios to bring the web-slinger into the expertly crafted, multi-billion dollar Marvel Cinematic Universe. Which…

Keep Reading

75 Years of Marvel Comics celebrates the origins of the movie blockbusters

in Fiction by

In the 75 years of its existence, Marvel Comics has never been as far to the forefront of our culture’s consciousness as it is now. Avengers: Age of Ultron, the highly-anticipated sequel to the 2013 mega-hit Marvel’s The Avengers, is due to hit theaters May 1, followed by Marvel Studio’s 12th superhero flick, Ant-Man, on July 17. Marvel Comics also announced recently that the Marvel Universe, the most ambitious effort at serial fiction ever produced by humankind—a continuous storyline that has lasted more than 53 years—will come to an end and be replaced by a new universe this year. And the iconic images of Marvel’s mightiest characters now grace merchandise from T-shirts to knapsacks to bed sheets to guitar picks.…

Keep Reading

Oscar’s Best Animated Motion Pictures — and one that was overlooked

in Potpourri by

We here at BookTrib are huge fans of Designer Daddy (a.k.a. Brent Almond) who graces our site with his knowledge of popular culture and blogs about (among other things) his preschooler, superheroes and the adventures of parenting. One of the pleasures of Brett’s work is his “Super Lunch Notes,” the colorful and wonderfully geeky slips of paper he sneaks into his kid’s lunch before he heads off to school. And these notes aren’t just “Have a nice day,” or “I’m so proud of you!” These are notes full of fun, flair and all the magic today’s magical pop culture renaissance. Recently, Almond was kind enough to share with us some of his latest Super Lunch Notes, which are based on…

Keep Reading

Marvel’s Agent Carter joins the sisterhood of kickass heroines

in Fiction by

As we look ahead at all the wonderfulness that our favorite geeky TV shows will to bring us this spring, fans of Marvel’s Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. will get a look at the early days of their favorite clandestine organization with the new series Agent Carter. Starring British actress Hayley Atwell, the show follows the adventures of Captain America’s best gal, Peggy Carter, as she overcomes both danger and 1940s male chauvinism in her never-ending battle against the forces of evil.   The journey to the small screen was a unique one for Agent Carter. Originally created as a love interest in the film Captain America: The First Avenger, Carter later appeared in her own “one-shot” short film that was included…

Keep Reading

When Disney meets Marvel: Big Hero 6

in Fiction by

On the heels of the phenomenon that is Frozen, Disney brings us Big Hero 6, the latest Marvel-based offering. Judging from the excitement the film is creating amongst Gen X-ers and Millennials (not to mention the people in my house), Disney is set to have another mega-hit. Billed as a comedy adventure, it tells the story of 14-year-old prodigy Hiro Hamana and the special bond that develops with the robot, Baymax, on their quest to solve an unsettling mystery. When a devastating event befalls the city of San Fransokyo and catapults Hiro, a student at San Fransokyo Tech, into the midst of danger, he turns to Baymax and his brilliant fellow nerds, turning them into superheroes. Perhaps the most remarkable…

Keep Reading

Women writers and illustrators soar to new heights in the comic book industry

in Nonfiction by

So the Mighty Thor—at least on the printed page—is now a woman. Rarely has a gender-bend made as many headlines as this one, with both fans and non-fans alike weighing in with thoughts and opinions on the new Goddess of Thunder. But as a new heroine picks up Thor’s hammer and assumes his powers and duties and Comic-Con comes to New York City, so are more and more women picking up pens and brushes and making their return to the world of comic books—a medium in which they once flourished. “There have always been women in comics,” said Colleen Doran, a writer, artist and cartoonist who has drawn some of the medium’s most famous characters. “It’s very popular to say…

Keep Reading

Will meta-humans rescue the new television season?

in Fiction by

After dominating the big screen for the past several years, it was only a matter of time before comic book-inspired stories made their mark on television. And while such shows have already established a toehold on the small screen with series like Smallville, Arrow, and Marvel’s Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D., this TV season will see a quantum leap in the number of superheroes getting their own network time slots. Here’s a sneak peek at some of the comic book franchises that will come to life in your living room this year. Gotham (FOX) Gotham City may be a nice place to visit but I wouldn’t want to live there, what with all the bizarre super-villains waiting to wreck havoc on its…

Keep Reading

50 years after the Warren Commission Report, a graphic novel sheds fresh light

in Nonfiction by

Fifty years ago this week, the President’s Commission on the Assassination of President Kennedy—better known as the Warren Commission—released its official finding: an 889-page report asserting that Lee Harvey Oswald acted alone in assassinating President John F. Kennedy, and that Jack Ruby similarly acted alone in killing Oswald, who was in police custody and being transferred to a county jail at the time of his shooting. Perhaps the only event in American history as closely scrutinized as Kennedy’s assassination was the report designed to settle all inquiries about the crime. To this day, the debate over whether or not Kennedy died at the hands of a conspiracy involving organized crime, communist agents or our own government still rages, and over…

Keep Reading

Your Guardians of the Galaxy (spoiler free!) cheat sheet

in Fiction by

A long time ago, in a galaxy far, far away… Wait—wrong franchise. Still, Marvel Studios is hoping for Star Wars-like success with the release on Friday of its latest offering, the action/comedy space epic Guardians of the Galaxy. The film is based on a comic-book series that doesn’t have a lot of name recognition amongst the general public. Of course, it wasn’t long ago that Iron Man and Thor were regarded as “second-tier” Marvel superheroes—and look how they turned out. Still, when you’ve got a band of ne’er-do-well heroes that includes a rifle-slinging raccoon and a talking tree, you’re reaching way outside the box for characters that are trying to score big with the target demographic. So here’s a breakdown…

Keep Reading

The Uncanny X-MEN: Heroes for the outsider in all of us

in Potpourri by

One of the hallmarks of the great mythical hero is that he or she is apart from society—an outcast. Sure, Robin Hood may steal from the rich and give to the poor, but what thanks does he get? He’s branded an outlaw, hounded by the authorities, and forced to live in the forest. So it is with Marvel Comics’ Uncanny X-Men, heroes who, while maybe not possessing the household name of a Superman or Spider-Man, have defined the pinnacle of comic book success during the past five decades. The X-Men were created by two of comicdom’s most legendary figures, writer Stan Lee and artist Jack Kirby, in 1963. Lee and Kirby envisioned a team of young mutants—people born with special…

Keep Reading

Huckleberry Finn, Holden Caulfield and…Spider-Man? Literature’s great teenage characters

in Fiction by

The modern-day superhero may have started with Superman in 1938. But the superhero as we know him—the first to be truly considered a “character” in a literary sense—was unveiled in 1962, in the most unlikely circumstances, when a radioactive spider bit a shy, bookworm of a teenager in the pages of Marvel Comics’ Amazing Fantasy #15. That was when Spider-Man was born. Spider-Man was a marked departure from teens who had preceded him in the comic book pages. He was, in fact, not a man, but a boy—or a young man, at least. Until 1962, most comic-book teenagers were sidekicks to their grown-up counterparts—Robin to the adult Batman, or Bucky to Captain America. (Unlike the Bucky made famous in the…

Keep Reading

The CAPTAIN AMERICA cheat sheet from the BookTrib Nerd Squad

in Fiction by

You’ve agreed to go see the new Captain America movie with your offspring/BFF/main squeeze/parental unit but you’re just not sure who is who. The redhead is the Black Widow? How does that work? Why does everyone keep mentioning what happened in New York? And what put the guy with the eye patch in such a bad mood? Well, wonder no more. Our resident experts on nerd culture have assembled this easy primer on who’s who in the Marvel Cinematic Universe.  We’ll have you sounding like a fanboy or girl in no time. So go ahead, study up, there might be a quiz. Captain America, a.k.a., Steve Rogers: You can’t miss him—he’s the big guy with the star in the middle…

Keep Reading

Go to Top