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Margaret Mitchell

All the Feels: The First Book That Made You Cry

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Whether or not you’re an easy crier, there’s usually one book that manages to hit you straight in the feels. For some of us at Early Bird Books, The Fault in Our Stars was the first to bring on serious waterworks (we’ll never read John Green on the subway again). For others, it was Bridge to Terabithia or Philip Pullman’s The Amber Spyglass. As for our awesome readers, The Red Fern Grows seems to have broken the majority of your little-kid hearts. In fact, other than tragic relationship stories like The Notebook, most of your first-time tearjerkers featured animals of some sort—Charlotte the spider and Old Yeller the dog, for example. And while you probably can’t say you enjoyed mourning…

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5 of TV’s Most Lackluster Kisses & the Books that Did it Better

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Any romance lover knows that it’s all about the kiss. Maybe the couple is standing in the rain. Maybe one person is stroking the other’s face. Maybe they’re already tearing each other’s clothes off on the way to the nearest bed. Or, in a perfect world, it’s all three at once. (Hellloooo, Notebook.) But sometimes the kiss is just not good. The lips are getting jammed together awkwardly. There’s just no chemistry. You’re not always sure why, but a bad kiss is kind of like pornography: you know it when you see it. Regardless of the reason, here are the top five worst TV kisses and the books that did it better: Carrie & Big in an Elevator, Sex and…

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Is Gone with the Wind a classic or a chestnut from a more prejudiced time?

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This February marks the 75th anniversary of Gone with the Wind’s 1940 all-out Oscars grab. That year, the film won eight Academy Awards, including Best Picture, Best Film Editing, Best Art Direction, Best Cinematography in Color, and Best Writing/Screenplay. Additionally, Victor Fleming took an Oscar home for Best Director. Vivien Leigh, who played Scarlett O’Hara, won Best Actress in a Leading Role. And, most importantly, given the film’s backdrop of America’s Civil War and Reconstruction eras, Hattie McDaniel took home an Oscar for Best Actress in a Supporting Role, making her the first African American to be nominated for and win an Academy Award.   With the 2015 Oscars right around the corner, Gone with the Wind—a film often categorized…

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Five authors whose fame rests on a single great novel

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“When he was nearly thirteen, my brother Jem got his arm badly broken at the elbow.” And so begins Harper Lee’s seminal 1960 novel, To Kill a Mockingbird, where we’re introduced to young Jean Louise “Scout” Finch, her brother and protector, Jem, and their father, the wise attorney and champion for justice Atticus Finch. Equal parts coming-of-age tale, Southern Gothic, and social commentary, Mockingbird—this is the pre-Katniss Everdeen version featuring the bird—is one of the most beloved novels of the 20th century. In 2006, in a poll conducted in Britain, librarians ranked it as the book every adult should read (it came in ahead of the Bible). The themes—racial inequality, rape, loss of innocence—are as resonant today as they were…

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The star wore Prada: How great fashion can save a lackluster film

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Any book lover has had the unique experience of watching one of your favorite novels come to life on the big screen. It’s a moment filled with fear that the story will be butchered, forever tainting your view of the book, and awe that you’re finally seeing something you’ve only ever pictured in your mind. I’ve watched some truly awful adaptations of my favorite books (I’m looking at you, The Time Traveler’s Wife) and some truly amazing ones (hello, Princess Bride). But sometimes the beauty of a movie can triumph regardless of what’s happening in the story. A character will put on a certain dress or suit and make a scene pop in a way that didn’t seem possible in…

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