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life advice

Ron Clark’s Move Your Bus asks: Are we a “rider” society?

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Coming from a family of entrepreneurs, I know that there are those who are runners in business and in life — but what do we do about those who are merely riders? These words, “runner” and “rider,” are courtesy of Ron Clark, the New York Times bestselling author of The Essential 55 and winner of Disney’s “American Teacher of the Year.” He was even Oprah Winfrey’s “Phenomenal Man” selection and he has founded The Ron Clark Academy in Atlanta, Georgia; to date, over 25,000 educators have visited. There, parents and teachers learn how to better unlock a child’s potential. Perhaps you caught The Ron Clark Story, an uplifting film starring Matthew Perry? Clark’s latest book, Move Your Bus: An Extraordinary New Approach to Accelerating…

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Forget struggle. Why not just surrender?

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When you think of someone who simply “let go,” it’s likely that negative assumptions spring to mind. Maybe he went a little too wild and lost all semblance of rationale and sensibility. Or perhaps it’s more depressing; perhaps this person “let go” of all his responsibilities simply because the strain was too great. But is it possible to let go, to surrender to life, and to still achieve all your goals? Will you have a story to write? Ask Michael A. Singer, the New York Times bestselling author whose new book, The Surrender Experiment: My Journey into Life’s Perfection (Harmony, June 2, 2015) explains how in fact, you can have it all. It’s a fascinating, true-life premise: One man decides to live alone in…

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Finding The Masterpiece Within: Realize your dreams

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Pablo Picasso, a guy who knew a thing or two about art, once said- “Every child is an artist. The problem is how to remain an artist once he grows up.” Now, a pair of inspirational writers has taken that idea one step further. “Every child born into this world is a work of art,” write Claudia Church and Guy Scholz. “Parents do the best they can, but no matter the circumstances in which we were exposed, none of us have the privilege of a picture-perfect upbringing void of sadness, heartache, loneliness, discouragement, disappointment and anger.” What if each one of us, by recognizing our potential, could recapture that childlike state into which we were born, despite life’s hardships? What…

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