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Jordan Foster

#FridayFlashback : The JFK Files, What’s Left to Know?

in Non-Fiction by

As we await the release of the remaining documents on the JFK assassination investigation and peruse the few pages that have been released, we have gone back through the BookTrib archives and found an interesting piece that asks the one question everyone is hoping the files will reveal: “What is left to know?” This piece from 2013 is certainly fitting for a #FridayFlashback and interesting to boot. “Once upon a time” is how fairy tales begin. Most of the time they end with the prince (maybe he used to be a frog or a particularly arrogant member of the royal family) and the princess (sometimes she had an unfortunate penchant for fruit or severe sleep issues) living happily ever after.…

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Holmes, our game is now afoot

in Fiction by

“Eliminate all other factors,” that most famous of detectives once said, “and the one that remains must be the truth.” Sherlock Holmes first appeared over 125 years ago and, a federal judge recently ruled, he’s here to stay. In fact, he could even stay at your house and you could write a story about it. The rights to the great logician, his loyal chronicler Dr. John Watson, and the villainous Moriarity are now in the public domain, meaning that the Sir Arthur Conan Doyle Estate may no longer demand a licensing fee should you want to write a book about Holmes solving the disappearance of your puppy. According to U.S. copyright law, the fifty stories and novels Doyle published before…

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The madame and her Frenchman

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December 12th marked the 192nd birthday of French novelist Gustave Flaubert, best known for his tale of the perpetually unhappy titular housewife, Madame Bovary (1857). Emma Bovary, the sexually repressed and generally unpleasant focal point of the novel, is glumly married to the rather boring local doctor and spends the book longing and scheming for the passion, ecstasy, and luxury she’s experienced only in books. Like any good heroine doomed to go down in flames (paging Anna Karenina), Madame B. has her share of affairs, accumulates substantial debt, before—spoiler alert—ending it all with arsenic, much as Edith Wharton’s Lily Bart would do nearly half a century later in The House of Mirth, albeit with a popular “sleeping aid” made of choral hydrate. But both are…

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Go to the post office or write a novel?

in Fiction by

Let’s guess what you did today. Did it involve long lines at a) the post office, b) any store that sells items that are gift-able (not gift-worthy, just physically able to be purchased, wrapped, and presented as a holiday token) or c) both? Perhaps the only lines you accrued were the number of purchases now pending on your credit card statement, after you spent the day surfing the Internet and buying things for other people (and yourself, because, well, you deserve it after all that website navigation). Now, let’s take a look back at what some familiar names accomplished on this date in years past . Because, really, the holidays are all about comparing how cool your new toy is versus…

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Tattoos are forever

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Remember that Swedish girl, the one with the tattoos? She’s back. Or at least she will be in 2015. No one needs to be reminded how many copies the dearly departed Swede Stieg Larsson’s Millennium Trilogy have sold (millions) or in how many languages you can read about the adventures of star hacker Lisbeth Salander and occasionally disgraced journalist Mikael Blomkvist (here’s a hint: how many states are in the Union?). Don’t forget the film versions, bringing audiences Scandinavian moodiness in two languages and deeply dividing book fans into competing (Swedish) Noomi Rapace and (American) Rooney Mara camps. A decade after The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo came out in Sweden, back when Larsson was an unknown (and, unfortunately, also…

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Move over Amazon, the Brits are in the sky race

in Potpourri by

Before Amazon’s delivery drones even take flight, they’ll have some competition from across the pond. The competitors won’t be as shiny, or as easily wrangled, but they are programmed to fly. The British bookstore chain Waterstones announced on their website the launch of a new delivery system, O.W.L.S. (Ornithological Waterstones Landing Service). Introduced in the clip below by their aptly named press manager Jon Owls, this service “consists of a fleet of specially trained owls that, either working individually or as an adorable team, will be able to deliver your package within thirty minutes of you placing your order.” For those of you who have the tendency to lump all things British into a Hogwarts-sized heap, O.W.L.S. should not be…

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