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Jeffrey Eugenides

13 Novels That’ll Take You Back to School

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When we think of our school days, we remember hours spent in the library, lecture halls that sat hundreds, and all-night study sessions before semester exams. But beyond our academic pursuits, we also encountered plenty of interesting characters. Whether it was a dorm room neighbor, an eccentric professor, or a fellow classmate, the people we met—and the lessons we learned—helped shape who we are today. The campus novel has always been a staple of literature, but the 13 books listed below are at the top of the class. Whether they follow a junior’s coming-of-age journey or satirize elitist academics, each one explores the formative—and sometimes crazy—antics that can happen within the hallowed halls. Less Than Angels, Barbara Pym Though Catherine…

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The Hot List: Jeffrey Eugenides’ Fresh Complaint and The Best New Book Releases for This Week

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Every week, Booktrib brings you The Hot List: the list of brand new releases you won’t want to miss. With some of the most poignant biographies, fascinating mysteries, funny, touching, and introspective fiction, there’s something for everyone to find here. For the first week of October, these are the hottest new releases. Fresh Complaint: Stories, Jeffrey Eugenides From critically-acclaimed author Jeffrey Eugenides, who won the 2003 Pulitzer Prize for Fiction with his novel, Middlesex, comes a collection of short stories, each one exploring the rich and intriguing facets of human nature, romance, family ties, and the concept of fulfillment. Eugenides’ eloquent writing style, as well as his complex plot lines grab the reader from the beginning of the first page. Previous fans of…

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Why the geometry of the love triangle pulls us in

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Contained within the simple geometry of a love triangle are all the ingredients for an engrossing plot. There are characters (desired and desiring, therefore compelling); conflict (fights and lies and changes of heart); and resolution (someone will win, someone will lose, the triangle will be broken apart). Is it any wonder, then, that we return to these stories again and again? In his newest novel, I Loved You More (Hawthorne Books, April) Tom Spanbauer manages to give readers a fresh look at this well-worn story. Spanbauer, whose works explore issues of sexual identity, race, and family, is the author of four previous novels and the founder of Dangerous Writing. Ben, the narrator of I Loved You More, explains the appeal of…

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