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J.D. Salinger

Laurie Petrou’s Sibling Rivalry on Steroids

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In Laurie Petrou’s Sister of Mine (Crooked Lane Books), the lives of two orphaned sisters, Hattie and Penny, begin to fray as longstanding resentments, sibling rivalry and unpaid debts overflow and the ties of sisterhood start to snap. It’s a fast-paced thriller by Petrou, a debut novelist who also is an Associate Professor at Ryerson’s RTA School of Media and speaks on topics such as gender and rejection. See what she has to say about her first work, family relationships, and her own literary journey. BookTrib: You’ve said you never set out to write suspense. How did Sister of Mine evolve into the thriller it is? Laurie Petrou: In order for the sisters’ relationship to be put to a test, there…

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Fables, Fairytales and Folklore: Discussing ‘The Rules of Magic’ with Alice Hoffman

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Alice Hoffman is the New York Times bestselling author of Practical Magic, which inspired the cult-classic film by the same name starring Sandra Bullock and Nicole Kidman. In this week’s episode of Just the Right Book Podcast, the New York native joins Roxanne to discuss witches, feminism, family secrets, and her latest book, The Rules of Magic. The book which is set in New York City in the sixties is a prequel to Practical Magic and was picked by Reese Witherspoon for her October 2017 Book Club read. The actress and book lover described the story as “full of magic, love, family, heartbreak and redemption.” When asked what attracted her to witches and magic, Alice Hoffman reveals how she grew…

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Now Trending: Could New J.D. Salinger Books Be on the Horizon?

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J.D. Salinger has been in the spotlight in recent weeks – something the famously reclusive author would probably have hated. But between the September biopic, Rebel in the Rye, and a recent New York Times article about possible new books from the author, he’s getting more attention than ever. It begs the question: how would Salinger feel about all of this renewed interest in his life and art? About a week ago, The New York Times ran an article titled, “So Where Are the New J.D. Salinger Books We Were Promised?” In it, they wonder at the presence of new work by the author, who, according to several sources, kept writing long after his final authorized publication in 1965. A…

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J.D. Salinger and Other Reluctantly Famous: 5 Authors Who Stayed Out of the Public Eye

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From Stephen King to J.K. Rowling, there are plenty of recognizable authors who regularly interact with both the press and the public. But what about the ones who aren’t quite as willing to step into the limelight? More than a few authors have chosen to eschew the fame completely, sometimes even living in solitude instead of engaging with the world. The most well-known of these reclusive authors is easily J.D. Salinger, who also happens to be the topic of the recently released Rebel in the Rye. Salinger wrote 5 books over the course of his career, as well as dozens of short stories. He’s most famous for Catcher in the Rye, of course, his coming-of-age novel about angsty teen Holden…

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What Ron Suskind learned from his autistic son about using experiences to shape our story

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“The amazing part of this whole journey is what we all learned,” says author Ron Suskind reflecting on his family’s long journey that started in 1993 after his youngest son, Owen, was diagnosed with autism. The quote applies equally well, though, to anyone who reads Suskind’s book about the experience. Suskind is a Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist and the author of five books of creative non-fiction dealing with topics ranging from race and class in America, to the Bush administration, the war on terror, and the American economy. In his latest book, Life Animated: A Story of Sidekicks, Heroes, and Autism (Kingswell), he turns his journalist’s eye on his own family, detailing the turbulent years after Owen was diagnosed with autism…

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Coming of age with Catcher in the Rye author, J.D. Salinger

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Catcher in the Rye—the quintessential coming of age novel—made J.D. Salinger one of the most famous American authors of all time. Though it was first published almost 65 years ago, it is still an iconic book in the American canon, and its once reclusive author, who died in 2010, still holds a prominent place in the hearts of his fans. We recently sat down with author Joanna Rakoff, whose new memoir, My Salinger Year (Knopf, June) details the year she spent working for J.D. Salinger’s literary agent, to ask her thoughts on what it means today to come of age, and how she was affected by her relationship with one of the most mysterious literary figures of our time. BOOKTRIB:…

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My dear, you SHOULD give a damn

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Lists are everywhere. Books are everywhere. So it makes sense that lists about books are omnipresent. There are lists of the best books ever written, the worst books ever written, the books you should read before you die, the books you should read to make sure you never die (immortal vampires, anyone?), and everything in between. I hate to be the one to break it to you that it is impossible for you to read all the books currently in publication, let alone the thousands coming down the pike. Even with that new-fangled app that purports to let you read a novel in 90 minutes (that’s a gripe for another time), you simply won’t get to turn every page of…

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