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In Cold Blood

How To Judge A Book By Its Cover: 18 Famous Books

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Have you ever stopped to think about how your favorite books’ covers were conceptualized? The Grapes of Wrath cover artist, Elmer Hader, made a living illustrating children’s books with his wife, and that’s how John Steinbeck discovered his work. The stories behind some of the most iconic book covers are truly fascinating, and this infographic from Invaluable highlights some of the most recognized throughout history. Check out how each designer brought their visions to life!   Want more BookTrib? Sign up NOW for news and giveaways!

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Frightened and Flustered: The Books You Read Too Young

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BookTrib is partnering with Early Bird Books to bring you more great content, including this article about some of your favorite novels as a teenager. Read on for more! A few weeks ago, an Early Bird Books meeting devolved into a passionate discussion about the books we stuffed under our mattresses, read by flashlight, and bought with our weekly allowances. Hilarity ensued. But after realizing our souls were similarly (and eternally) corrupted by Flowers in the Attic, we quickly realized we wanted to hear your answers, too. We were so excited to see your responses—yes, we did read all of them!—and hear about your innocent acts of bookish rebellion. While Judy Blume, VC Andrews, and Peyton Place seemed to have ruffled the most pre-tween feathers, there were a couple…

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Fargo: The Best TV Show You Aren’t Watching

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It may have been easy to miss the Season 2 premiere of FX’s Fargo this past Monday. In a slew of other hotly anticipated autumn premieres over the past two weeks, like The Walking Dead, American Horror Story: Hotel, and Arrow, FX’s anthology series based on the Coen Brothers film of the same name may have snuck by unnoticed. However, a show as utterly flawless as Fargo deserves not only your weekly attention, but your love, your theorizing and every Emmy. Seriously, every single Emmy. There are a few special elements that set Fargo apart from its fall competition. For one, the simple, yet sharp, writing is so darkly hilarious that watching it actually makes you feel smarter. Secondly, there’s…

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Here’s to you, Mr. Mailer

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It’s high praise when Joan Didion declares you the only person capable of writing a particular story. This is a woman who knows from voice. In her review of Norman Mailer’s 1979’s Pulitzer Prize-winning novel The Executioner’s Song, Didion says, “I think no one but Mailer could have dared this book. The authentic Western voice, the voice heard [here], is one heard often in life but only rarely in literature.” Mailer, who died in 2007 at age 84, helped spearhead a movement known as “new journalism,” a term often used to describe the work of Truman Capote and Tom Wolfe, wherein the storytelling techniques of a novel are grafted on to real life. It’s not quite fiction and it’s not…

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