Tag archive

Hurricane Katrina

Tall Poppies Review: “The Feathered Bone” Brings Light to the Darkness

in Fiction by

Sometimes we open a book of fiction hoping to escape to another place and time. While we read, we can imagine living in a world of wizards and gentle giants; diving 20,000 leagues under the sea; or flying in a hot air balloon over rainbows and yellow brick roads. At other times, fiction pulls us into the dreams and fears of those who live through hardships that most of us can hardly imagine. These are the stories that make news headlines, that cause us to shudder, and that move us to hold onto our loved ones a little bit tighter. They’re the stories that open our eyes to dire struggles in the world – and they’re the stories that inspired…

Keep Reading

BookTrib’s Q&A with ABC’s Meteorologist Ginger Zee: On Natural Disasters and Being One

in Non-Fiction by

ABC News Chief Meteorologist Ginger Zee is no stranger to covering natural disasters. In her new memoir, Natural Disaster: I Cover Them. I Am One., Zee discusses her life and admits in an interview with her Good Morning America co-host, Robin Roberts, “I am messy.” It is not self-depreciation, a but self-awareness that Zee brings to the interview— the same self-awareness she brings forth in her book. Stressing self-forgiveness, depression and the very real pressures of life, Zee is candid, insightful and incredibly funny! Recently, we did an e-chat with Zee and asked her about the book, finding a life-career balance and what her life is like behind the camera. Here’s what she had to say: BookTrib: You’re very funny,…

Keep Reading

The Traveling Gourmand shares what it means to eat New Orleans

in Non-Fiction by

Long before “locavore” was a word, before the Food Network made cooking a spectator sport, before Chez Panisse and California cuisine, before even Julia Child and James Beard—a good century or two before what we now think of as the seminal moments on our culinary timeline—there was New Orleans. It’s true that rich and diverse food cultures could be found from sea to shining sea, but New Orleans food was the haute cuisine of America. Jambalaya, brimming with andouille sausage; shrimp gumbo, thick with okra or file; crawfish étouffée, creamy, savory and utterly delicious; less fancy but no less satisfying muffaletta and po’boy sandwiches; oysters so rich (and green) they were named for Rockefeller; sweet, delectable pralines; boozy, buttery, flaming…

Keep Reading

Go to Top