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Writer’s Bone Podcast: The Humble Beginnings Historical Writer Stacie Haas

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Stacie Haas, author of the middle-grade, historical fiction novel Freedom for Me: A Chinese Yankee, talks to Daniel Ford about wanting to be a writer since she could hold a pencil, how she caught the history bug, the inspiration behind her debut novel, and how her publishing journey led to 50/50 Press. Stacie Haas is an award-winning professional and creative writer with a background in business communications and public relations. She has degrees in American History and English and is a graduate of the Institute of Children’s Literature. Stacie’s writing has been published in Skipping Stones and St. Anthony Messenger magazines and online as she competes in many a flash fiction contest. To learn more about Stacie Haas, visit her…

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2017 Goodreads Choice Award Winners Are Here! How Did Our Picks Match Up?

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Yesterday, Goodreads announced their 2017 Choice Award Winners. If you recall, BookTrib’s Senior Editor, Aisha K. Staggers, and Contributor, Rachel Carter, shared their picks from their list of nominees. Here are the winners of the Goodreads Choice Awards for 2017, see how our picks match up! 2017 Winner in Fiction Little Fires Everywhere, Celeste Ng Aisha: We featured a lot of the books nominated here on BookTrib, so it was a difficult choice. I chose Little Fires Everywhere by Celeste Ng. I have a teenage daughter and so I could relate to the main character being a single mom and raising a daughter at that stage in her development. What really was interesting to me was how boldly the author addressed the transracial adoption;…

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‘First, Be a Lady:’ The Impact of FLOTUS on American Politics

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Political scientists have failed to recognize the political importance of the president’s spouse. While the evolving role of the first lady over time from White House hostess to presidential advisor has been documented in historical narratives and news articles, the tremendous responsibility placed on her office to communicate the president’s message and shape his public image has received little attention according to Lauren A. Wright, Ph.D. in her book ON BEHALF OF THE PRESIDENT: Presidential Spouses and White House Communications Strategy Today. This responsibility has increased markedly in the last three presidential administrations, illustrated by the fact that Michelle Obama made more speeches and major public appearances in her first six years in office than any first lady in history.…

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History and Music Play in Perfect Harmony in ‘Do Not Say We Have Nothing’

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Rarely does a book come along that is as masterfully written as Do Not Say We Have Nothing. From critically-acclaimed author Madeleine Thien, the novel was shortlisted for the 2016 Man Booker Prize, and was awarded the Scotiabank Giller Prize and the Governor General’s Literary Award, among many others. Living in Vancouver, Marie and her mother invite into their home Ai-Ming, a Chinese refugee fleeing the crackdown in the aftermath of the Tiananmen Square Protests in 1989. The novel beautifully splinters apart, delving into different subplots, but all centered around Marie finding and tracing her family history, and the connection between her father Kai, a talented pianist, and Ai-Ming’s father Sparrow, a brilliant composer, as well as a violin prodigy. Do Not Say…

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#FridayFlashback : The JFK Files, What’s Left to Know?

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As we await the release of the remaining documents on the JFK assassination investigation and peruse the few pages that have been released, we have gone back through the BookTrib archives and found an interesting piece that asks the one question everyone is hoping the files will reveal: “What is left to know?” This piece from 2013 is certainly fitting for a #FridayFlashback and interesting to boot. “Once upon a time” is how fairy tales begin. Most of the time they end with the prince (maybe he used to be a frog or a particularly arrogant member of the royal family) and the princess (sometimes she had an unfortunate penchant for fruit or severe sleep issues) living happily ever after.…

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Ron Chernow Shares Insight on his Newest Novel, ‘Grant’

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Just the Right Book! Podcast, hosted by Roxanne Coady of Connecticut’s acclaimed, award-winning, independent bookseller R.J. Julia, is now available on BookTrib.com, the premier website where readers meet writers. The podcast and BookTrib are both dedicated to helping readers find their next favorite read and this pairing will open up a world of great possibilities. In this week’s episode of Just the Right Book! podcast, Roxanne Coady joins author Ron Chernow to talk about his latest expository biography on Ulysses S. Grant. Just who is Ron Chernow? He is the Pulitzer Prize-winning writer, historian, and journalist who wrote the biography that became the inspiration behind the record-breaking, hip-hop Broadway musical Hamilton.  In Chernow’s newest novel Grant, he paints the former president as a flawed…

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Mental Health and Family Relationships Come Together in Yoerg’s ‘All the Best People’

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At BookTrib, we are constantly searching for the best ways to connect readers with writers, opening their eyes and worlds to fresh ideas! This is how we came across a wonderful group known as the Tall Poppies, who are not only avid readers, but extremely talented writers as well! This week, Katie Pryal reviews Sonja Yoerg’s ‘All the Best People.’ The heart of Sonja Yoerg’s All the Best People is Carole LaPorte, one of the book’s narrators, a mother of three and wife to Walt, the owner of an auto shop in small-town 1970s Vermont. Carole’s world starts to fall apart when she begins to question whether she might be like her mother, Solange, who has been locked in Underhill, the…

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Yale’s Secret Societies Are Revealed in ‘Skulls and Keys’

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Secret societies have always held a certain fascination for America, the mystery around their operations and initiations inspiring hundreds of rumors of just how much influence they have, and how far that influence can reach. In an era of sororities and fraternities becoming more open and public with their workings, collegiate secret societies have once more come under the spotlight. Often having a long-standing presence in university history, these organizations have only become more renowned for the lack of transparency in their workings, and the secrecy of whether they are even still active. Out of all the colleges, however, no campus is more aware of the presence of secret societies than Yale University, home to over a dozen secret societies,…

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Poetry and Climbing the Highest Mountains in These New Podcasts

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BookTrib.com recently added Writer’s Bone to our weekly features. Daniel Ford and Sean Tuohy have been bringing us podcasts of discussions they have with writers about the craft of writing and what motivates them to tell a good story. We hope you enjoy this series as much as we do. In the first episode we have to share with you, Poet Marcus Wicker speaks with Daniel Ford about his new poetry collection, Silencer. Wicker discusses the personals of his life, such as why he pursued an MFA and how hip-hop influences his poetry. He personally shares one of his poems on the air and explains the differences between writing, reading, and speaking poetry. You may know Marcus Wicker from his other book of poetry, Maybe the…

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10 Must-Read Political Biographies for History Buffs

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BookTrib is partnering with Bookish to bring you more great content. One of the most fascinating parts of studying history is diving deep into the life of a man or woman who helped to shape the world we live in today. Readers who share that sentiment are in luck. We’ve rounded up ten biographies that feature figures who had an impact, for better or worse, on American politics. The Marquis: Lafayette Reconsidered, Laura Auricchio This biography by Laura Auricchio introduces readers to a key figure in two historic revolutions: Gilbert du Motier, best known as Marquis de Lafayette. He was passionate about freedom and when he heard about America’s fight for liberation from England, Lafayette used his money and influence in France to secure a position…

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13 Books You Absolutely Must Read Before Seeing Kathryn Bigelow’s ‘Detroit’

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The Summer of ’67 was a unique time in America’s history that some fondly remember as a season full of love, music and flower power. Still, for others in major American cities, that summer was awash in civil unrest, where waves of injustice led to rebellion and social change. A new film directed by Kathryn Bigelow and starring John Boyega, Anthony Mackie, Will Poulter and Algee Smith re-enacts the 1967 incident at Algiers Motel in Detroit that left three young men dead. This event marked a turning point in the civil rights movement when lost innocence gave way to a revolution now undeterred by fear. The youth of the day had seen the worst and they were ready to fight so in…

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Books Capturing the Romance and Heartbreak of ‘The Light Between Oceans’

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The Light Between Oceans comes out in theaters Friday, September 2 and We. Can’t. Wait. And not just because it stars Michael Fassbender (though, yum). Originally a book written by M.L. Stedman in 2012, The Light Between Oceans is one of those heart-wrenching stories that stays with you long after you finish it. If you haven’t read the novel, get yourself to a bookstore ASAP. But in the meantime, here’s the movie’s lusciously-beautiful trailer:   Doesn’t it look so good? Fassbender stars as Tom Sherbourne, a WWI soldier who returns from war and falls madly in love with Isabel Graysmark (Alicia Vikander). The two move out to a remote lighthouse where they live in near-isolation. After a few failed pregnancies, Isabel is…

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If You Like Starz’ Outlander, You’ll Fall in Love with These 10 Books

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As a self-proclaimed Outlander junkie, I’m always on the lookout for different books that are just as romantic and compelling as my favorite series. Claire and Jamie are a force to be reckoned with, and it’s not easy to live up to that kind of love. Not to mention the historical details that Diana Gabaldon brings to the narrative, or her unique touches of fantasy and mystery. But over the years, I have found a few books that come close. Here they are, along with this guarantee: if you like Outlander, you’ll love these 10 books. Promise. Outlander Book Recommendations Into the Wilderness, Sara Donati (Delta, 2008) This is the first book in a series that Gabaldon herself recommends to readers — and…

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Go Team USA: Inspiring Books to Get You in the 2016 Summer Olympics Spirit!

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Ahhh, the Olympics: the magical time of year when you’re allowed to chant “USA! USA! USA!” un-ironically with your face painted like Old Glory. But while this week marks the kick off of the 2016 Summer Olympics, this year’s Olympic Games in Rio de Janeiro seem a little different, amidst controversy about the water in Rio, concerns about the Zika Virus, debates about nation-wide bans due to doping and anxiety over event security, these Games seem more than a little hectic and apprehensive. Despite the (valid) trepidations many have over the Summer Olympic Games, fundamentally, the Olympics are a time to celebrate. The world is already pretty crazy, so it’s helpful to remember that people are, in fact, capable of coming…

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Listen Up for These Giveaways!

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Comment for a chance to win one of this week’s brand spanking new titles. Original Fake by Kirstin Cronn-Mills In this Banksy-inspired illustrated novel, an escalating sibling rivalry train wrecks and vengeance is a street-art act of war Introvert Frankie Neumann hates his life, and understandably so. He’s got a weird, tutu-wearing sister, Lou, and even weirder parents, Bridget and Brett—Frank Sinatra and Dr. Frank-N-Furter impersonators, respectively. And, he’s just the guy who makes pizza at Pizza Vendetta. Though he has secret artistic aspirations of his own, his over-the-top family makes him want to stay in the background. But Frankie’s life is about to change—becoming way more interesting, even a little dangerous, but definitely cool. After his shift at the…

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